NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA may have failed to prove there's an underground ocean on Saturn's moon Enceladus, but now scientists claim they've found outstanding new evidence that there may be a vast ocean under the surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. In this newly released image, Titan peeks out from behind Saturn while another moon, Tethys, streaks past the planet's shadowy rings. Click through for a gorgeous Titan gallery.

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

NASA's Probe Will Buzz Titan Landing Site

Scientists began to suspect a global ocean when they saw some landmarks on Titan had shifted up to 19 miles between October 2004 and May 2007. The best explanation is a vast ocean, separating the planet's icy crust from its rocky center. The Cassini Space probe will fly within 620 miles of Titan, sample the atmosphere, and take pictures of the site where the Huygens probe landed.