This 7-minute clip from Wanted supposedly depicts the "realism" of this super-powered secret assassin movie. Though director Timur Bekmambetov insisted that his writers and designers make this movie as realistic as possible, you won't see much gritty true-to-life stuff in this fanciful, exciting chase scene — though I think the dialog is fairly realistic. I love seeing Wesley Gibson (James McAvoy) screaming for Angelina Jolie to stop for most of the ride. So what exactly is realistic about this flick, and why would we want realism in a comic book movie anyway?

On the realism front, check out the costumes. Gone are the superhero outfits of the comic. Fox is dressed in a nice summer frock and pulls guns out of her purse: bye bye bat-belt and flashy strap-on technology. This is what Bekmambetov and his writer Derek Haas mean by "realism." Everybody looks civilian.

Also this clip does give us a small dose of real-life physics — or at least a stab at them. Sure the heroes can make their bullets curve, but when Fox shoots out the front of her Viper, she has to physically lift the wind shield — forget sexy scattering glass from one bullet. This is real life, lady. It takes work to make way for a shoot out. This also lends to the hilarious confusion from Wesley as he taps on her leg to get her to move her body ever so politely, because she's still an unknown stranger to him. I'm glad he just didn't "awaken" to his powers but still fumbles for some sort of social decorum when a hot lady is practically spread eagle and hanging out of a car in front of him.

Still, these stabs at realism seem just like that: stabs. I'm still wondering why we'd even want realism in a movie like this, whose whole point is that ordinary schlubs can become ninjas overnight.