Where Is Batman In The Dark Knight?

Don't get me wrong; I know that Batman is as much about the gadgets as he is the whole parents-getting-killed-so-he-fights-crime thing. But the last two posters to be released promoting The Dark Knight have both focused much more on the Batcycle than they have the caped crusader; all you can see is his head, on both posters. Holy guano, Batfans; why are Warner Bros hiding the dark knight?

I'm all for mystery, but in the fifteen posters released for The Dark Knight to date, not only is the eponymous hero of the movie absent from eight of them, there are only three where you can really see more than his head or a hand - and in two of those, he has his back to you. When you can actually see more of Christian Bale's Batman in a Got Milk advertisement than the movie's own publicity, you have to wonder what's going on. We've narrowed it down to three possibilities:

Where Is Batman In The Dark Knight?

Someone finally realized that the movie Batman costume looks ridiculous: Yes, it's practical with all the padding and everything, but look at it - It's like he's wearing a tire. It's a movie where we're already buying a hundred different unbelievable things, so why do we have to care about the believability of his body armor? Whatever happened to the simplicity of the comic book outfit, with the grey and the black and wearing his pants on the outside?

Christian Bale couldn't breathe in and push out his chest for the length of the movie, and almost all publicity shots they had made Batman look fat: Hey, crimefighting's a tough gig, and who can manage to look glamorous all the time when keeping a city safe from Aaron Eckhart 24-7? Just as cops like to stereotypically take a break by having a doughnut or several, so does a Batman like to indulge in his pastry of choice: The bearclaw.

Where Is Batman In The Dark Knight?

Warner Bros wants to convince fans that Batman is now a Transformer: It sounds ridiculous, I know, but think about it: Transformers was a massive hit last year, and Warners may be hoping that the audience out there is so hungry for new stories about heroes who can turn themselves into vehicles that they'll mistake Batman's head on a bike to mean that Batman has, himself, taken his crusade for justice so far that he was willing to turn himself into a part-man, part-bike cyborg if it meant Gotham City was even 1% safer at night. And when most people haven't seen anything other than Batman's head and his massive bike, who's to say that that's not the case?

It's sad to see that the folks at Warners seem to be downplaying Batman in the advertisements for his own movie. I mean, I like The Joker as much as the next man, but you pay too much attention to him and not your star and you end up with... well, the first Tim Burton Batman. And no-one wants to go through that again.

[The Dark Knight]