This Space Elevator Is The Terrorists' Next Target

Author David J. Williams has premiered some amazing art from his upcoming future-thriller book The Burning Skies on his blog, including this fantastic Phoenix Space Elevator. Click through to see a gorgeous space station.

This Space Elevator Is The Terrorists' Next Target

This is the Europa Platform, the largest space station in existence - and like the Phoenix Space Elevator, it's a target of Autumn Rain, a group that poses a threat to the very fabric of Williams' future society. (Click that link to see an amazing painting of the chaos that ensues when the space elevator crashes, burning, to Earth, after the Autumn Rain attack.)

Here's what Williams says about the space station image:

I'm particularly pleased with Randall MacDonald's Europa Platform artwork: most of the stuff that's out there featuring O'Neill cylinders dates all the way back to the 1970s, and Randall has cranked out some gorgeous stuff that feels oh-so-modern.

In The Burning Skies, the second book in Williams' future thriller series:

Life as U.S. counterintelligence agent Claire Haskell once knew it is in tatters-her mission betrayed, her lover dead, and her memories of the past suspect. Worse, the defeat of the mysterious insurgent group known as Autumn Rain was not as complete as many believed. It is quickly becoming clear that the group's ultimate goal is not simply to destroy the tenuous global alliances of the 22nd century-but to rule all of humanity. And they're starting with the violent destruction of the Net and the assassination of the U.S. president. Now it's up to Claire, with her ability to jack her brain into the systems of the enemy, to win this impossible war.

Battling ferociously across the Earth-Moon system, and navigating a complex world filled with both steadfast loyalists and ruthless traitors, Claire must be ready for the Rain's next move. But the true enemy may already be one step ahead of her.

It comes out on May 19, and we'll be reviewing it around then. Also on Williams' site: a terrific set of pictures of military hardware from the Second Cold War.