Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

David Lynch's movie version of Dune may have its detractors, but up-and-coming Australian fashion designer Ben Pollitt used it as the inspiration for his summer 2009 range. Hence the "second skin" designs in our gallery.

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Fashion Designer Crafts Garments For The Harsh Conditions Of Arakis

Pollitt told The Australian newspaper that his new fashions included a limited edition psychedelic alien print, plus a whole line of clothes designed to be reminiscent of Lynch's Dune:

David Lynch's 1984 science fiction film Dune was the inspiration for the range Pollitt presented last night in the atrium of the University of Technology in Sydney.

He enlivened his signature blacks with saturated film colours including green, yellow, orange and red, along with deep silvers and dove greys to capture the essence of deep space and its surrounding galaxies as portrayed in Dune.

Garments in Pollitt's favoured washed and treated leathers, silk georgettes and jersey fabrics had intricate panels and zippers in homage to the "second skin" space suits worn by characters in the film.

"The suits were a second skin to protect them from the elements," Pollitt said. "They felt like extensions of their muscles and ribcages and I've applied those ideas to modern garments without making them too costumey."

I really only have one question. I get how it's a tribute to Dune, as well as an edgy, post-apocalyptic, androgynous look worn by people who would not survive five minutes in an actual post-apocalyptic world. But why does nobody have any eyebrows?

Images from Sonny Photos, The Vine and A New Muse.