Last week a group of scientists reported in Science that they had created the tinest droplet of acid ever produced on Earth. It was created within a superfluid helium cluster at 0.37 kelvin. Observing this ultra-small acid drop allowed researchers to study how such droplets interact with water in our atmosphere to create chlorine which eats up ozone. Until this experiment, nobody had understood how chlorine could be created in the cold wastes of our upper atmosphere. Now we know it's via the interactions between acid and water ice, which then erode holes in our ozone layer. Which leads to more ultraviolet spectrum hitting the planet, which leads to genetic mutations in many life forms.

And that's how one droplet of acid leads to mutants. Get the scoop at Science and on PhysOrg.