Exploring the Literary Implications of Dr. Manhattan's Glowing Blue Junk

Do you spend hours analyzing the moral philosophy of Watchmen, the multicultural occultism of Promethea, or what Lost Girls says about storytelling and human sexuality? Consider submitting a paper to an upcoming academic conference on the work of Alan Moore.

Nathan Wiseman-Trowse, Senior Lecturer in Popular Culture at the University of Northampton, is currently soliciting papers for the conference "Magus: Transdisciplinary Approaches to the Work of Alan Moore." In his call for papers, Wiseman-Trowse asserts that academic explorations of Moore's works have thus far been fragmentary, and that the conference will be the first academic event dedicated to discussing Moore's literary and cultural contributions. Topics he is looking to cover include:

* Comic revisionism and the graphic novel
* Comics and literature
* The political philosophy of Moore's canon
* Moore's relationship to the mainstream comic industry
* Adaptations of Moore's work to screen and other media
* Psychogeography and place in Moore's work
* Magick and spirituality
* Site-specific events
* Pornography and erotica in Moore's work
* Fandom and reception
* The underground press
* Collaborations and networks
* Music and musical collaborations
* Intertextuality and referentiality

If you've got an insight on Moore you're dying to share, submit an abstract of 300 words or less to Nathan Wiseman-Trowse by December 4th. The conference itself will be held at the University of Northampton on May 28th and 29th, 2010.

Call for Papers: Magus: Transdisciplinary Approaches to the Work of Alan Moore [via Forbidden Planet]