Snake Plissken Heads Back Into New York PrisonS

Escape From New York, Again! is back in play. Why? Because the studio's found someone who can allegedly write witty Snake banter without making it sound campy. An impossible task, maybe — but nevertheless, they're going through with it.

New Line Cinema has hired Allan Loeb (21 and Wall Street 2 ) to rewrite the new Escape To New York reboot, and according to New York Magazine's sources, the script's dialogue doesn't stink of campiness and overwrought dialogue.

Loeb has reportedly changed Plissken's mission from saving the president who's crash-landed in the middle of future Manhattan, now a giant prison, to rescuing a female Senator. Who wants to bet she's a feisty take-charge lady, with a kick-ass body to match?

The biggest issue for this film, according to NY Mag, wasn't just the banter, but the location. It's expensive to turn Manhattan into a giant futuristic prison. But it sounds like the studio figured out a plan.

In the original, set at the end of World War III, New York City was a husk of itself after being turned into a giant prison, but that kind of destruction gets pricey.* So in Escape 2.0, the Big Apple that the as-yet-uncast Snake Plissken is dropped into will be geographically undesirable, but intact: This Manhattan was evacuated and turned into a privately run penal colony after the detonation of a crude radioactive dirty bomb on the outskirts of the city. "It is not a disaster movie," says a source close to the project. "It is an exposé of an ecosystem, if you put a huge wall around Manhattan and then dropped in the most fucked-up, dangerous criminals on Earth." This means New York will still be recognizable to audiences, à la I Am Legend, rather than an entirely new Armageddon Island.

That's all well and great, but no one has answered our burning question: Who's going to play the Duke of New York? We assume there will be a Duke, since Snake was legally required by John Carpenter retain the same eye-patch and "always be a bad ass," or he wouldn't sign over the rights.