New Nightmare On Elm St. Might Actually Live Up To The OriginalS

We compared the new Nightmare On Elm Street with the original, to see whether Jackie Earle Haley is worthy of the infamous Freddy Krueger glove. We measure on-set details, trailers and posters to see how they measure up. Spoilers ahead...

Here are our comparisons of the old and new Freddy epics:

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Dark Horizons talked to the new Freddy, Jackie Earle Haley about how he changed today's Freddy and here's his reponse:

"We delve in a little bit more, and we learn a little bit more. But it's very based on stuff that we've learned prior. I think he's a bit more serious than what we've seen before. [Freddy's] a little more pissed."

This is the first bit of news that's made us excited about the new Nightmare on Elm Street.

Also interesting, this interview from IESB with Kyle Gallner, the goth kid from Jennifer's Body, who plays Quentin.

Q: Can you tell us a little about your character, Quentin?

KG: Quentin is…he's kind of like that guy that is, he's not like the super-popular kid, but everybody kind of knows him a little bit. He's the kid that walks down the hallway and it's like, ‘Oh, hey, what's going on.' He's that kind of guy. But Quentin's an interesting kid. You know, we don't touch on the fact that Quentin has a mom — he doesn't really have a mom in the movie, so he's got like the mom issues on top of the dreams and his dad. I don't think he gets along very well with his dad. I think he has a little bit of a high stress home life, so he's kind of got a little bit of anger issues, I feel. I mean, this is the way I'm playing him, with slight anger issues and maybe some daddy issues, and my mom's not there. I'm also kind of like, you know, I pop Adderall — I'm kind of this weird, offbeat kid. He's a good kid though. At the end of the day he's a good kid. It's just he's a little high strung and I think what he's going through, he doesn't really know how to handle very well, so he kind of turns to drugs a little bit, and he gets very fidgety and agitated by the end of the movie.

Q: So are some of his personal issues specifically incorporated into his dreams? Does Freddy taunt him with things that bother him?

KG: Not really, not so much. I think that's kind of a separate side. I don't think Freddy really cares about my issues with my mom and whatever. But … it's a weird thing. My dreams are almost, they're not so much like terrifying nightmares — like, I do have some scenes in the boiler room and stuff — but it's almost like a weird thing where Freddy almost uses me as a bit of a vessel, I guess, to kind of show me what really happened to him, as opposed to just torturing me in my dreams. Like, in my first dream, he doesn't even come after me. He's showing me what really happened to him. Later on, he definitely gives me some business in the boiler room, but no, he doesn't incorporate my own personal issues with his vendetta.

Interesting so it sounds like Freddy won't be playing too much into the caricature that he became over time, it's all scares and scar tissue here.

Read the rest of the interview at IESB.