The Man Who Makes Will Ferrell Funny May Direct "Cokehead Superhero" Epic

The man wrote and directed Step Brothers and Anchorman and whose daughter is Will Ferrell's mean-baby Landlord might be taking on the superhero-hating R-rated comic The Boys. Which means we may have a new superhero comedy blockbuster on our hands.

Ever since we heard that Rob Corddry wanted a part in Columbia's live-action adaptation of the Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson's The Boys comic, we've been excited about the potential of this film. And we're even more pumped, now that Nightmare's on Elm Street director Sam Bayer mentioned that he might have been passed over for the job directing the film in favor of Adam McKay.

It's not that we don't like Bayer — we just love McKay's work, and the whole team of brilliant comedians that will line up to work with him. Can you even imagine the crazy coke-head superheroes from The Boys' world acted out by the likes of Paul Rudd, Will Ferrell, and John C. Reilly? It could be good, really good.

And rumors have it straight from Bayer via Film School Rejects that McKay is the director Hollywood wants for this film:

It's so funny, I would die to do that comic book. From what I've heard from the producers on the movie is that Adam McKay is doing it. He did Anchorman, I guess. The studio is really hot on him and… Let's have the movie [A Nightmare on Elm Street] come out this weekend and do really well. Then we'll see how my stock is in Hollywood.

Sadly for Bayer, we'd rather see McKay attack this as well. If you haven't heard of this comic here's a brief synopsis:

The series is set in a contemporary world very much similar to the real one, with one notable exception: a number of people have some form of superpower. The series follows a superpowered CIA squad, known informally as "The Boys", whose job it is to keep watch on superheroes and, if necessary, intimidate or kill them.

Needless to say the superhero world is full of d-bag idiots, and it's up to The Boys to keep them all in line. Fingers crossed this rumor is true, and Kick-Ass' box office hasn't killed Hollywood's appetite for R-rated, satirical superheroics.