R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist


The illustrator who made his bones illustrating classic titles like Creepy and Eerie before continuing Alex Raymond's genre-defining work on Flash Gordon and bringing Star Wars to comics has died at 79, leaving a vibrant legacy.

It's easy, looking at stunning work like the pieces in this gallery, to understand why Williamson enjoyed a rich and varied 40 years in the illustration business — his sense of scale, of the otherworldly, was unparalleled. And his shift from straight cartoonist to inker spoke to his generosity of craft: Williamson made other people better, both on the page, and by fostering new talents like Bernie Wrightson and Mike Kaluta.

Personally, I never got the chance to meet Williamson, and feel that generosity first-hand. But comics writer and artist Jimmy Palmiotti did — you should read his eulogy to get a feel for the man we lost.

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist

R.I.P. Al Williamson, legendary galactic artist