We're starving for a new science-fiction drama that doesn't substitute special effects for real character-based storytelling. So we're very hopeful for Mark Romanek's understated English drama, based on Kazuo Ishiguro's novel Never Let Me Go. Watch the film's first trailer.

It's hard to talk about this film without completely giving away its big surprise. Just know there's a twist that is gradually revealed in Ishiguro's novel. But the meat of the story is the relationship between the three students: Ruth, Tommy, and Kathy. The book follows these three students through the eyes of Kathy [Mulligan]. Indeed their ulta-strange, super-secluded, and seemingly idyllic private school Hailsham, is preparing them all for something — but what?

Here's the spoiler FREE synopsis:

As children, Ruth (Knightley), Kathy (Mulligan) and Tommy (Garfield), spend their childhood at a seemingly idyllic English boarding school. As they grow into young adults, they find that they have to come to terms with the strength of the love they feel for each other, while preparing themselves for the haunting reality that awaits them

Here is the spoiler FILLED Wikipedia synopsis of the novel. Look away if you want to stay unspoiled:

The novel describes the life of Kathy H., a young woman of 31, focusing at first on her childhood at an unusual boarding school and eventually her adult life. The story takes place in a dystopian Britain, in which human beings are cloned to provide donor organs for transplants. Kathy and her classmates have been created to be donors, though the adult Kathy is temporarily working as a "carer," someone who supports and comforts donors as they are made to give up their organs and, eventually, submit to death.

Many people have called this the thinking person's The Island. But really, it's so much more. The deep terror, paired with the innocent curiosity and blind faith these characters have, is soul-crushing. We're very excited that these three actors were picked to star in this intense picture, and we're interested in what Romanek, the director of One Hour Photo, will do with Ishiguro's novel.