Your new Doctor Who catchphrase: "Wibbly wobbly explodey wodey."

Prepare to watch what might be the silliest Doctor Who skit since the 1980s classic "A Fix With Sontarans." Yes, sillier than David Tennant on Extras. It's Matt Smith and the exploding thingy, at the Proms!

The Proms, incidentally, aren't something where high school students dress up and dance to a crappy band, then sneak off to a hotel room to angst over teen sex. They're an annual event in London featuring big, splashy orchestral performances, including some quite good classical music. And Doctor Who has done a special concert at the Proms once before — in 2008, when various monsters appeared on stage during orchestral performances of themes from the show, and David Tennant appeared on video screens in a specially filmed scene, "The Music Of The Spheres."

So in 2010's Proms, Karen Gillan appeared on stage as an announcer, and once again various monsters in costume popped up on stage, while the orchestra played a selection of tunes from the show as well as other popular tunes. As Den Of Geek puts it:

In terms of the music, we essentially got to sit through the entire last series again, only without the dialogue. It's when the words are stripped away that you really appreciate the beauty of Amy's Theme or that the glorious Dambusters pastiche, Spitfires In Space, deserved a better episode than Victory Of The Daleks....

But it was tracks like I Am The Doctor, Matt Smith's signature theme music, accompanied by his speech to his enemies atop Stonehenge, that we'd come to hear. And a medley of music from The End Of Time had the audience applauding, as every Doctor's regeneration was shown on screen, culminating in Vale Decem (Tennant's regeneration music) with thousands silently mouthing the words "I don't want to go" at the appropriate moment. There was even time for Song Of Freedom from Journey's End, a joyful chorus that could have pulled the Earth back into place all on its own.

And then, to finish, that theme tune. The best theme tune ever. Live. At the Royal Albert Hall. No matter what you think of the new arrangement, there aren't many instrumentals that you find yourself singing along with. Seriously, they should make it the national anthem.

And then Smith himself appeared on the screens, in a Steven Moffat-penned scene that carried over into a live performance. The whole thing was broadcast on the BBC last night, and here is:

Was that extremely silly or what? I just hope they broadcast a follow-up in a few weeks, when the unfortunate young man with the preternatural ability to avoid giggling does indeed turn into a giant bird with X-ray vision.