Tax-burdened witches cast spells on the Romanian government (using feline feces and dead dogs)

Last Saturday, Romania implemented a law requiring self-employed citizens to pay a 16% income tax and to contribute to social service programs. Witches, who count as self-employed workers, aren't thrilled and are hexing the government en masse.

From AP:

Angry witches are using cat excrement and dead dogs to cast spells on the president and government who are forcing them to pay taxes. Also in the eye of the taxman are fortune tellers, who should have seen it coming.

And President Traian Basescu isn't laughing it off. In a country where superstition is mainstream, the president and his aides wear purple on Thursdays, allegedly to ward off evil spirits.

Witches from Romania's eastern and western regions will descend to the southern plains and the Danube River Thursday to threaten the government with spells and spirits. Mauve has a high vibration, it makes the wearer superior and wards off evil attacks, according to the esoteric group Violet Flame - which practices on Thursdays.

I'm no expert in paranormal law, but I'm pretty sure psychics (and the occasional neighborhood spell caster) have their income taxed over here in the States (or simply conduct their affairs under the table). Still, the United States doesn't have a popular tradition of witchcraft — the 2009 Romanian presidential loser alleged that Basescu's reelection team sabotaged his campaign with negative energy and the strategic usage of purple clothing. (See, this is why Congress is always at loggerheads. Everyone's firing their negative energies off willy-go-nilly, and nobody's wearing fuschia to gain the upper hand.)

Also, I can't remember the last time my Congressman was threatened with a potion made of cat poop and dead dog parts. Said queen witch (and horror stew brewer) Bratara Buzea of Romania's tax evasion troubles, "They want to take the country out of this crisis using us? They should get us out of the crisis because they brought us into it."

[Photo credit: AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda]