Internet-controlled shotguns are the high-tech, extremely illegal solution to hog infestation

A man in southern Georgia, apparently fed up with all the wild hogs on his property but unwilling to spend unnecessary time outdoors, set up a complex network of webcams and powerful shotguns to solve his little problem.

The setup, believed to be the work of former property owner Jay Williams, allowed the user to observe the immediate area using webcams and then fire the guns remotely. The firearms were aimed towards a nearby food plot that's often infested with wild pigs. The guns were expensive Benelli shotguns, chambered for 3-inch shells and equipped with magazine extension tubes. For those of you who, like me, don't know the first thing about guns, here's what that means - those shotguns could have killed a ton of hogs. And then some.

There were two identical apparatuses in the area, for a total of six internet-connected firearms. A utility contractor came across them back in November 2010 and alerted the authorities. Homeland Security investigated to make sure there weren't any more sinister motivations behind the internet-controlled guns. In a recent bulletin, they reported their findings:

"At this time there is no evidence to suggest that such equipment was established for any purpose other than illegal hunting activity. However, the apparatus could be used for more nefarious activity that would be of direct concern to the law enforcement and public safety communities. While law enforcement has been aware of such capabilities for some time, very few agencies have come across actual clandestine systems such as the one found in 2010."

The bulletin does not address what must be considered the really important question: how long until internet-controlled shotguns become the focus of a computer age scare movie? With a central premise as crazy as that, we might just approach Untraceable levels of ridiculousness.

[The Augusta Chronicle]