Martian crater gets hit by meteorites again...and again...and again

Most of the craters created by meteorite and asteroid impacts are round, nothing like this strangely elongated, oval-shaped crater recently discovered on Mars. This crater just might be the trendiest meteorite landing spot on all of Mars.

The crater was discovered by the European Space Agency's Mars Express probe, which found this unusual formation in the planet's southern hemisphere. To explain its unusual shape, ESA scientists speculate that two initial meteorites - quite possibly the same meteorite split in two - struck the ground at a shallow angle and dug the initial crater. But there are unusual depressions within the crater - sub-craters, if you will - that suggest still more rocks have hit that same spot afterwards.

There's no logical reason why so many rocks should hit more or less the exact same spot on such a big planet. In all likelihood, it's just a crazy coincidence. Indeed, this spot can likely lay claim to being the most battered spot on Mars, perhaps in the entire solar system. So, word of real estate advice - if you're looking to set up your Martian summer home, I'd suggest choosing a different spot.

[Scientific American]