We sat down with Source Code star Jake Gyllenhaal, and quizzed him about the science behind the movie. Does he believe that memories could be stored on computers? What's based on actual science in this film? Watch our interview.

Do you think that one day we will be able to access memories on a hard drive?

Gyllenhaal: When I read the script, that's why I loved the movie. It was because essentially the center of the movie is about this computer program that allows you to enter someone's body for the last 8 minutes of their life. I think maybe it's a long time coming, but with so many other possibilities, I wouldn't necessarily rule it out, the ability to access memory. Or not even memory really but experience.

Did you study the science behind the film?

Gyllenhaal: Particularly my job is more about, what would be the emotional effects of something like this? What would it be like if I found myself there. If I had a background in the army and in flying helicopters. If I was put in this situation, how would I respond? To me it was the human behavior aspect of it that I was fascinated with.

Duncan sent me lots of different videos. And one of them was pilots in pilot training school, when they do G-force training. And their responses to the first time they go into G-force, because they have a simulator that they go into. It's actually relatively funny, because a lot of them lose consciousness, and then come to and don't know what happened. That's what I was into. This is a similar experience. When he wakes up at first (and I don't know if this is in the final version of the movie) but we did say, the first time, "Did I A-lock?" which is a common response when you lose consciousness when you go into G-force. He comes to and he's like "whoa am I just tripping out am I hallucinating did my helicopter go down?" Nope, you're on a train sitting next to a woman saying she knows you and you have no idea who she is. And you're in somebody else's body.

Video by G Jesse Martinez.