Last night SGU dropped a massive bomb on our home planet. Thank goodness the odd couple was around to diffuse the situation. Ha! But seriously folks, this was a dark little episode of Stargate... with a French Stewart cameo.

Apologies about missing last week, it's been crazy around here. And what a week to miss! It was so ridiculous, I think it deserves some additional chatter. So please feel free to talk in comments about the double Rushes and Telford's do-over death scene. The whole fiasco was pretty brutal, and while we liked the electric death, we're kind of sad it didn't keep, technically.

Now, on to "Alliances" thanks to a few amazing commenters we now know that the bomb the Lucian Alliance tried to drop on home world command was a "weapons-grade Naquadria device with a probable yield of 50-70 megatons." Jesus. That's a big freaking bomb. That's equivalent to the Tsar Bomba — again, a really huge freaking bomb (see instructional video).

While I absolutely loved learning about this massive killing machine from the commenters, I have to admit. I had zero clue about the severity of this device until I checked in on o-deck and someone compared it to the Tsar. Which kind of points out a big problem I have with SGU. A lot of the plot is getting lost in the science, for me. Granted, I love to learn, and this was a great moment. But after listening to French Stewart (who BTW was fantastic in this episode) describe the Destiny's hidden message as, "a recording over a million years old, captured with technology I can't imagine, processed and filtered using algorithms I don't understand," I was wasting all my time thinking about the hidden equation Destiny is trying to teach us, about God, or no God, or the structure of God. So when folks started talking about this massive bomb, the technical discussions just seemed like more jargon. That shouldn't have been the case, since this was a BIG freakin' bomb!

I'm slowly starting to tire of the superfluous equations on SGU. Especially if it causes me to tune out, when the important science is getting discussed. As much fun as it is to see people standing at their Destiny kiosks doing math, I'd much rather watch a crew of engineers work on the awesome hydroponics lab in the Destiny. Or what about the fix-it robot? Can the scientists play with that?

But, let's not harp on the equations, the episode as a whole was fine. Absolutely not as exciting as last week's "Twin Destinies", but we did get to see the odd couple of Greer and Camile at it again. I'm astounded, after Greer went space tick bananas, that Camile can even stand to be in the same room with him — but Camile seems like the "Business first, I'll deal with his attack on my life later" kind of lady.

The Lucians — you remember them — attacked our home planet with a GIANT bomb. Greer and Camile are stoning home and get stuck in the bodies of a Senator and French Stewart. They have to work together to defuse the bomb and save the planet. While I loved watching Camile out-fox the Lucian terrorist, the real meat of the story, for me, was Stewart's character. I adored the fact that he was sabotaging the mission because he realized that his body back on Earth was absolutely wrecked with radiation, and I wish we could have spent more time on that sort of blind "I want to live" desperation, as opposed to forcing him to be a hero.

What this episode did manage to accomplish was reminding the audience that the folks on Destiny (while misfits) are a scrappy bunch of intelligent people. They're slowly starting to bond and now the people stoning onto THEIR ship are the real misfits. I like watching the crew become a family. And Greer and Camile finally finding peace with each other was a great way to demonstrate this new bond. It was no double-Rush sitcom, but it still had some heart.