An insightful look at the life and work of Marie CurieS

Many of you may have noticed that today's Google Doodle honors famed physicist and chemist Marie Curie, in celebration of her birthday. But this year also marks the centennial of her second Nobel Prize. (It bears mentioning that Curie was not only the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, she is also the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person ever to win in multiple sciences.)

Top image is Marie Curie as portrayed by Susan Marie Frontczak in "Manya," a one-woman drama on the life of Marie Curie.

In recognition of her achievements, Smithsonian magazine recently assembled a number of pieces that explore not just the impact of Curie's work, but some of the more rarely examined facets her remarkable life. Featured here is a short excerpt from "Madame Curie's Passion," an exceptional in-depth feature by Julie Des Jardins that really warrants a read:

When Marie Curie came to the United States for the first time, in May 1921, she had already discovered the elements radium and polonium, coined the term "radio-active" and won the Nobel Prize — twice. But the Polish-born scientist, almost pathologically shy and accustomed to spending most of her time in her Paris laboratory, was stunned by the fanfare that greeted her.

She attended a luncheon on her first day at the house of Mrs. Andrew Carnegie before receptions at the Waldorf Astoria and Carnegie Hall. She would later appear at the American Museum of Natural History, where an exhibit commemorated her discovery of radium. The American Chemical Society, the New York Mineralogical Club, cancer research facilities and the Bureau of Mines held events in her honor. Later that week, 2,000 Smith College students sang Curie's praises in a choral concert before bestowing her with an honorary degree. Dozens more colleges and universities, including Yale, Wellesley and the University of Chicago, conferred honors on her.

The marquee event of her six-week U.S. tour was held in the East Room of the White House. President Warren Harding spoke at length, praising her "great attainments in the realms of science and intellect" and saying she represented the best in womanhood. "We lay at your feet the testimony of that love which all the generations of men have been wont to bestow upon the noble woman, the unselfish wife, the devoted mother."

It was a rather odd thing to say to the most decorated scientist of that era, but then again Marie Curie was never easy to understand or categorize. That was because she was a pioneer, an outlier, unique for the newness and immensity of her achievements. But it was also because of her sex. Curie worked during a great age of innovation, but proper women of her time were thought to be too sentimental to perform objective science. She would forever be considered a bit strange, not just a great scientist but a great woman scientist. You would not expect the president of the United States to praise one of Curie's male contemporaries by calling attention to his manhood and his devotion as a father. Professional science until fairly recently was a man's world, and in Curie's time it was rare for a woman even to participate in academic physics, never mind triumph over it.

Read the rest over at Smithsonian Magazine