A One-Ton Metal Mammoth Made from Old Farm EquipmentS

Drop what you're doing — this is more important. Oregon sculptor Jud Turner has built a life-sized model of a Columbia mammoth skeleton, he's done it with 95% recycled materials (mostly old farming equipment and agricultural tools), and it's probably the most jaw-droppingly bad-ass thing I've ever laid my eyes on.

I'm sorry, did you miss that? Gigantic, metal mammoth skeleton. Farm equipment. Bad-ass. You really need to see this thing.

Turner is all about using found objects, welded steel, and repurposed consumer items in his sculptures. His choice of media makes for some absolutely mind-blowing assemblage pieces, which are definitely worth checking out, but let's cut to the chase: you're here for the mammoth.

According to Turner, he was commissioned to create the scale model for the Moses Lake Museum and Art Center in Washington state.

"In 1950, a farmer found parts of a Columbia mammoth while digging an irrigation ditch, so this sculpture ties those two elements together," Turner told boingboing. He continues:

Part of the challenge in building it in my studio in Eugene, OR was that I had to make it in a way that it could be taken apart, and re-assembled without any additional welding. Just taking it down was one of the scariest operations I've ever undertaken in the studio (over a ton of sharp, rusty steel 15 feet in the air had to be lowered with manual genie-lifts.)

Color us impressed. You can check out more pictures of Turner's marvelous metal mammoth — along with an awesome photographic account of the building process — on his website.

[Spotted on boingboing]
Photos by Todd Cooper via Jud Turner

A One-Ton Metal Mammoth Made from Old Farm EquipmentS

View from above of the Mammoth and Turner in his studio.

A One-Ton Metal Mammoth Made from Old Farm EquipmentS

View from below the head.

A One-Ton Metal Mammoth Made from Old Farm EquipmentS

The sculpture at the Museum in Moses Lake, WA.

A One-Ton Metal Mammoth Made from Old Farm EquipmentS

Detail of the Columbia Mammoth front foot.