Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charming

Sculptor Carl Turner has created a series of half-realistic, half-fantastical mounted animal heads that were seemingly poached out of a Dr. Seuss book. According to Turner's back story for this project, these extinct specimens were acquired by zoologist Erasmus P. Jiggins and Sir Bartholomew Scoffer during an 1863 expedition to a lost island somewhere in the Pacific:

The examples relating to Scoffer's Island were quite unlike any others brought back by explorers before or since. The animals that Scoffer encountered were bizarre and fantastic in appearance, prompting many to accuse him of "huckstering and artifice." In a bold attempt to counter these claims he staged an exhibition and series of lectures in London's Baker Street in October of 1877.

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

Dr. Seuss taxidermy is equal parts disturbing and charmingS

[Carl Turner via Super Punch]