Green coffee bean extract is your next miracle weight loss pill

Ready for the next extract that everyone's going to be taking to try and lose weight? Move over, green tea; green coffee beans are next up to the plate. Dr. Joe Vinson presented his research at the Spring conference of the ACS, and in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, the extract actually did quite a bit to help people drop pounds.

UPDATE: This study has been retracted. "The sponsors of the study cannot assure the validity of the data so we, Joe Vinson and Bryan Burnham, are retracting the paper," write the authors, who originally published the article in a 2012 issue of Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. For more information, see here.

The study used doses of an extract of unroasted (green) coffee beans, with low doses of 700mg, and high ones of 1,050mg. The research was small in scope, just 16 obese people over the course of 22 weeks, all of whom acted as their own placebos, alternating between low-dose, high-dose, and an inactive supplement, each for a third of the time.

With no changes to diet or exercise, at the end of the 22 weeks, the participants had lost an average of 17 lbs, dropping 16% of their body fat — and Vinson thinks they may have dropped it faster if they hadn't been on alternating doses. He thinks these effects are due to chlorogenic acid, which is thought to reduce the absorption of glucose and lessen hyperglycemic peak.

Green coffee extract is already available through health food stores, so expect a massive uptick in sales in the near future. It's enough of a thing that Starbucks has even started producing drinks containing the stuff — so you can bet that green coffee bean will be the next acai (or whatever)

Image by Nathan leibel on Wikipedia