For $1.4 million, you can buy District 12 from The Hunger Games

Looking to invest in some recently iconic Tinseltown real estate? For just $1,400,000, you can own Katniss' haunts in District 12, which happen to be the 72-acre defunct company town of Henry River Mill Village, North Carolina in real life.

83-year-old owner Wade Shepherd — who has never read The Hunger Games — allowed the movie to film on his property, and its success has since brought a glut of nosy tourists. "Day and night, they're driving through, taking pictures, getting out and walking. I'm just bombarded with people," claims Shepherd.

Unbeknownst to many looky-loos, Henry River Mill Village has a grim history that makes it an apropos setting for the dystopian blockbuster. Explains the AP:

The mill, which opened in 1905, produced fine yarn. The village was designed as a planned community with company stores, walkways and green spaces. In 1966, a sheriff was shot and killed in the village by a mill worker. By the time Shepherd bought the town, three years after the mill closed, there were Thursday night poker games on the street, "and by Sunday afternoon, they were all drunk and shooting."

Shepherd lives across the river from the town, and says he bought the property "to protect my interests." He doesn't think he could make enough money to make it worth opening a tourist attraction, though he's considering a request to let a tour company bring a group through.

My money's on a bunch of die-hard Hunger Games re-enactors buying the property and living their lives out in Amish-style quietude, save for the occasional bow-and-arrow death match.

Via NY Mag. Top photo: Jeff Willhelm/Charlotte Observer