io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012SUPER BEST BATWOMAN FOREVER | Artist PixelKitties decided Lauren Faust's Super Best Friends Forever could use a little more Kate Kane. She even drew up a short Batwoman/Batgirl comic. Via The Uniblog.


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Why were 10 dead bodies found in Benjamin Franklin's basement?

In 1998, a group called the Friends of Benjamin Franklin House began renovations on Franklin's London residence, No. 36 Craven Street, and discovered a nasty surprise: 1,200 pieces of bone from 10 bodies, six of which were children. And the bodies were buried in the basement around the time Franklin was living in the house. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Neutrium: The Most Neutral Hypothetical State of Matter Ever

Of all the possible states of matter - dark matter, negative mass - this is the one that really brings on the nothing. Supermassive particles with no charge whatsoever. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012The Best Argument for Keeping Fringe on the Air

At times, Fringe season four has felt like an extended epilogue to a story that concluded at the end of season three. But last night's episode was compelling evidence that this show still has something new to say about its "two universes" scenario - and also about its central figure, Walter Bishop. It's been ages since an episode of Fringe allowed John Noble to shine as much as he did last night, and it was a great reminder of what he (and this show) can do, given the chance. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Here's the first interior artwork from Before Watchmen

Even if you're up in arms about the new series of Watchmen prequels, aren't you a bit curious to see what DC has in store for the early adventures of the Minutemen? More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Atari illustrations predicted Wikipedia in 1982

In 1982, Atari Alan Kay collaborated with Bob Stein, who had consulted on the Encyclopedia Britannica, to develop concepts for an "Intelligent Encyclopedia." They then commissioned Disney illustrator Glenn Keane to illustrate their ideas. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Pottermore is officially open to the public

It's been a long wait, but J.K. Rowling's interactive Harry Potter site Pottermore is finally sending out invites. Just be prepared to wait on the online version of Platform 9 3/4 for a little while first. After spending several months in beta, Pottermore is now open to registration. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Pennsylvania high school is shaped like the Millennium Falcon

Parkland High School in Allentown Pennsylvania bears an odd resemblance to Han Solo's smuggling ship. But instead of doing the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs, it circles the sun in 365 days and change More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Which fictional character shares your birthday?

Were you a January baby? You might share your birthday with Severus Snape, Sherlock Holmes, or Buffy the Vampire Slayer. If you're a Pisces, you keep astrological company with Zoe Washburne and Bruce Wayne. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs might have created life in other solar systems

Exogenesis is the theory that the building blocks for life came from elsewhere in the universe. The trouble is it doesn't explain where those building blocks came from in the first place. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012One of the most terrifyingly incomprehensible theories in physics…explained!

In the late 1980s, a pair of Russian physicists put forward a new theory that just might serve to unite all physics in one model. But it's so fiendishly complicated that decades later, few physicists are willing to touch it. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012Whatever happened to the iceberg that sank the Titanic?

Exactly one hundred years ago today, an ocean liner struck a block of ice and sank in the North Atlantic. The story of the ocean liner has been told hundreds of times. This story is about the block of ice. More »


io9 Roundup: April 15, 2012The Mathematical Proof that got a Physicist out of a Traffic Ticket

Dmitri Krioukov, a UC San Diego physicist, was recently given a ticket for running a stop sign. He went to court to argue the ticket, armed with a scientific paper that mathematically demonstrated that he really had stopped. He won. More »