Last night's meta look into the mind of Abed introduced a brand new character in the Inspector Spacetime universe: Temporary Constable Geneva (played by Annie). Take a look at the lovely lady fighting a pack of angry Blorgons — plus take some time to talk about the events that transpired in the Dreamatorium!

In last night's episode, the dickish side of Abed goes full tilt, when Annie starts meddling with his life (taking Troy away from him for one lunch). Not particularly eager to compromise on much of anything, Abed turns the Dreamatorium against Annie, whipping up scenarios where she smooched with Jeff while puppeting the rest of the cast with his own imagination.

But Annie pushes through (possibly out of guilt for "breaking Abed"), and attempts to unwind his strange virtual world, where the real Abed was hiding. When the two finally reach their conclusion, Annie finds Abed stuffed in a locker, "a place where people like me get put when others are fed up with me."

It's the first time we're actually seeing the world through the eyes of one of the most emotionally complicated characters on television right now. Instead of throwing away an episode like "Pillows and Blankets" as just a nod to the Ken Burns world, the past drama is actually Abed, fairly deeply. You find out that while we're rooting for some characters to grow new relationships (the show is particularly championing the eventual re-connection of Annie and Jeff, and Troy and Britta's new love each week) we finally see where Abed falls into all of this. He's afraid of getting stuffed back into the locker, and thus he lashes out at Annie.

Luckily, the show uses the science fiction construct of the Dreamatorium to show this rage and pain inside of Abed. And not just by locking him up, but by letting him show off his often one-sided opinions on everyone and everything. Doesn't mean we forgive him — but it does give us a lot more insight into his world.

Annie breaks down the Dreamatorium using his own vices, to explain to Abed why he isn't alone: "The scenarios you run in here are like great science fiction. They're impressive and detailed, and insightful. But they're not accurate for crap. Science Fiction never has been. Look at 2001. Did we have a Space Odyssey? No! We got snowboarding in the Olympics and over-validated Carson Daly... Your simulations are nothing more than anxieties. You're afraid you won't fit in, you're afraid you'll be alone. Great news — you share that with all of us, so you'll never be alone. And you'll always fit in."

And while we would argue with Annie on some of her points, we love the way Community uses science fiction staples to really dig into complicated characters such as Abed. Plus, we'll always have Inspector Spacetime.