Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetis

Upper class Victorians had a great affection for pets, from fashionable lap dogs to canaries, and even the occasional monkey. But Travis Louie envisions some far more fanciful companions for his proper gents and ladies, who keep squids and giant spiders as beloved family pets.

You may recall Louie's Victorian aliens, and here he returns to that juxtaposition of period fashion with monstrous — though not unappealing — creatures. Louie says that he was inspired to create this series after reading a book about tarantula care, and realized that fashionably dressed folks would attend spider shows, much as dog owners would a dog show, walking their tarantulas on leash. He's also cooked up a backstory to go with each pet. The family yeti above is something of an heirloom:

For as long as anyone can remember, there has always been a Yeti in the Wallace family. Victoria Wallace spent most of her adult life concentrating her efforts on "Yeti awareness". Over the last few centuries, it has become the Wallace family's primary philanthropic endeavor. No one knows for certain how long these docile hairy beasts can live. The current family Yeti is believed to be over 300 years old. It has become a tradition for each generation to have their portrait painted with the Yeti.

[The Art of Travis Louie via Laughing Squid]

Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetisS

Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetisS

Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetisS

Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetisS

Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetisS

Portraits of proper Victorians with their pet troll heads and yetis