The Awful Inhumanity of Using Bleach Enemas to Treat Autistic Children

There are almost no words for the inhumanity of this. Someone is not only promoting a treatment of bleach enemas to treat autistic children — every two hours, for 72 hours, every possible weekend — but they've started a religious organization to promote this, with "bishops" and other church officials touting the effectiveness of the Miracle Mineral Solution. Over at Thinking Person's Guide to Autism, Emily Willingham writes:

You read that correctly. Bleach enemas to cure autism. The protocols the members of this trio recommend for the MMS treatment are just… traumatizing even to read. One calls for a "treatment" every two hours for 72 hours, "every possible weekend." Humble writes of overcoming the "nausea barrier" to up the dosage. Evidently, a "therapy" that induces nausea and vomiting and fever and diarrhea is a "good" thing. And if you make up a "baby bottle" of it, that makes it seem even more innocuous—or insidious, depending on your perspective.

Any child who is subjected to this abusive and torturous treatment would find it more than insidious. Orac quotes a parent who writes about her non-speaking autistic teen that the boy can't tell her how he feels as she doses him with the bleach solution. He vomits and has diarrhea "all day"; she writes that he generally has a "sensitive" gut. Another mother set up a blog to describe trying MMS on both her autistic son and herself, a sufferer of rheumatoid arthritis. It's heartbreaking but also enraging to read her posts as they reveal more than she seems to see: Her son develops a sudden extreme fear of the bathtub, and she can't seem to understand why, even though six days earlier, she wrote that they were about to try an "MMS bath" (i.e., a bleach solution bath) on him. Then suddenly, the blog ends with, "I cannot continue this blog. Sorry."

Yet even as that parent presumably ended her experimentation on herself and her child, others crow about MMS and its "curative" effects for autism and claim "miracles."

If you've got a strong stomach, the whole thing is well worth reading, if utterly horrifying. [Thinking Person's Guide to Autism]