This is O (Omicron), a projection-mapping installation directed by Romain Tardy and Thomas Vaquié at the Hala Stulecia in Wrocław, Poland. Completed by architect Max Berg in 1913 to commemorate the centennial of the defeat of Napoleon, this memorial — with the aid of some well-placed lighting — becomes a pulsing machine from an unknown future. As the designers explain of this piece:

It is reasonable to think that when Hala Stulecia was built in 1913 Max Berg's ambition for his construction was to pass the test of time. What could have been his vision of the monument in the distant future? How did he imagine the olding of the materials? The evolution of the surrounding urbanism and populations? [...] By using references such as Fritz Lang's Metropolis or the utopian projects of Archigram to confront the different visions of the future at different times, we were interested in trying to create a vision of a future with no precise time reference. A timeless future.

For another collision of old buildings and newfangled technologies, see this Czech baroque chapel hopped up on lasers.

[AntiVJ via The Verge]