Lance Reddick talks Fringe, Dr0ne... and his new movie with Danny DeVito!

Lance Reddick is one of genre television's most indispensable actors, thanks to powerful stints on Fringe and Lost. Now he's branching out, appearing in a killer-robot webseries called Dr0ne and a dystopian future crime thriller called St. Sebastian — directed by Danny DeVito.

We sat down with Reddick, and he told us all about his upcoming projects — including what to expect from the final season of Fringe.

Minor spoilers ahead...

So we already premiered the trailer for Dr0ne a while back, and you can see a photo from it above. The webseries will appear on Justin Lin's Youtube channel in August, and Reddick just finished filming. Reddick plays the head of a contractor, a "mercenary agency" that contracts with the U.S. government in the near future. His company produces these drone robots for combat, and one of them goes rogue. "They've done a really amazing job," says Reddick. "It looks really good." He hopes that if the webseries does well, there'll be a second run of episodes.

And meanwhile, Reddick is starring in a dystopian future movie, currently called St. Sebastian. He plays a drug dealer, who's in a "cat and mouse" game with a cop in "an almost abandoned hospital in the middle of a war zone" in an American city. William Fichtner plays the cop who's hunting for Reddick, and Constance Zimmer plays a nurse who takes care of Reddick's injuries, and Lars TK plays Sticnher's partner.

"I co-produced it," says Reddick. "I actually brought the script to Danny [DeVito]. We were working on an episode of It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia last year." St. Stebastian was one of a few scripts that Reddick wanted to talk to DeVito about producing through DeVito's production company. "I had a couple of scripts that I wanted to talk to him about first, but as soon as I said that I had a thriller, he said, 'Oh, let me see that one.'" DeVito read the St. Sebastian script and liked it so much, he wanted to produce it — but only if he could direct it. Originally, screenwriter Bruce Terris was aiming to direct this film, and "I really thought Bruce was going to say no," says Reddick. But in the end, Terris was happy to have DeVito direct his script.

Shooting St. Sebastian "was a fantastic experience," adds Reddick. "I get to play a character that I've never played before, which was really a kind of petty street thug, running and fighting for his life." Reddick says there's more to the set-up than just a drug dealer hiding from the cops — but the fact that they're in a warzone in an American city may be a clue.

"There are these cops trying to preserve order, this drug dealer who may also be a murderer." And meanwhile, the nurse and the drug dealer are "trying to survive each other," while the drug dealer tries to escape, says Reddick. "It's a very scary movie."

As for Fringe, Reddick hasn't started work on the final season yet — and he's been told that he's only in a few episodes. It sounds like, reading between the lines, Broyles won't be as prominent a character now that the show's taking place in the dystopian future of 2036 and Reddick would have to wear makeup to appear much older. Reddick says he's definitely sad to have a smaller role in the final season.

I asked Reddick what he thought was going through Broyles' head when he found the red licorice stick, proving that Walter Bishop was back, in the episode "Letters of Transit." Reddick says:

When I was playing that scene I thought, "No, it couldn't be. That's impossible... but are they? It's not necessarily impossible, [but] it's out of the normal scientific possibility. It's not that they're dead, but as far as I know there's no way to bring people back [from amber]."

As to whether Broyles will be helping our heroes in secret, or just working for the Observers in the dystopian future, Reddick says, "I have no idea. They haven't told me anything. I don't even want to guess, because I could be completely wrong." After all, Fringe has a way of surprising you.