Fans have been speculating what characters from A Storm of Swords might appear in the upcoming season of Game of Thrones. At today's San Diego Comic-Con panel, George R.R. Martin revealed new cast members for Season 3.

Martin began the panel by apologizing for the absence of series creator David Benioff and D. B. Weiss, who are currently shooting Season 3. He also apologized for the absence of his "co-creator," "the 13-year-old boy who is responsible for all the boobies." Apparently, a scene in Belfast contained no boobies and our imaginary 13-year-old was called away.

After a video recap of Season 2, attendees were treated to a reel featuring some of the new actors we'll see in Season 3. Via WinterIsComing.net, that reel is up top. In addition TV's The Avengers own Emma Peel, Dame Diana Rigg, playing the Tyrell matriarch Olenna, the Queen of Thorns (which was announced earlier today), Clive Russell playing Bryden "Blackfish" Tully, and Kerry Ingram as Shireen Baratheon, the reel revealed Richard Dormer as Beric Dondarrion, Thomas Brodie-Sangster as Jojen Reed, Ellie Kendrick as Meera Reed, Paul Kaye as Thoros of Myr, Nathalie Emmannuel as Missandei, and Mackenzie Crook as Orell. WiC also reports Kristofer Hivju as Tormund Giantsbane, Philip McGinley as Anguy, Tara Fitzgerald as Selyse Baratheon, Tobias Menzies as Edmure Tully, and Anton Lesser as Qyburn.

Richard Madden (Robb Stark), Michelle Fairley (Catelyn Stark), Alfie Allen (Theon Greyjoy), Rose Leslie (Ygritte), Emilia Clarke (Daenerys Targaryen), and executive producer Carolyn Strauss. Without the creators on hand, most of the discussion dealt with the latest season, talking about Madden's experience with his direwolf (his filming partner was a "fantastic silver ball with a wooden stick") and Clarke's with the dragons (she got scale models and was very protective of them). The mystery of why people never wear hats north of the Wall was brought up, but never solved.

Perhaps the most interesting moment was when Martin discussed the politics of A Song of Ice and Fire. Martin noted that J.R.R. Tolkien disliked readers' attempts to treat his novels as an allegory for World War II, but Martin's key interest was in affairs of the human heart. He loves fantasy, and has loved it ever since he pretended that his pet turtles were scheming knights and lords and ladies, but as fantastic as all the dragons and castles and magic are, he said, "The heart of the story is the characters."