As philosophical debates go, it doesn't get much better than this. On January 28, 1948, British logician Betrand Russel faced off against Jesuit priest F.C. Copleston on BBC radio in a now-famous debate over the existence of god, and the metaphysical and moral implications of a god-governed (or godless) universe. Open Culture's Mike Springer sets the scene:

In the metaphysical part, which is presented here, Copleston espouses what is known as the cosmological argument for the existence of God. Elements of the cosmological argument go back at least as far as Plato and Aristotle, who held that the universe required a "prime mover" outside of itself. The version embraced by Copleston is derived from one of Thomas Aquinas' five ways to prove the existence of God.

Check out more analysis over at Open Culture.