Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

These drawings of sea monsters, taken from books written in Europe centuries ago, prove that you don't need CGI to create a seriously incredible creature.

An aquatic lion, pig and elephant from the ceiling of Church of St. Martin in Zillis, Switzerland, 12th century

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Monster Brains)

A crocodile from Liber Floridus (Book of Flowers), an encyclopedia by Lambert, Canon of Saint Omer between 1090 and 1120.

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Erik Kwakkel)

A crocodile from the Rochester Bestiary, c. 1225-1250

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Wikimedia Commons)

A lobster-fish hybrid from Ortus sanitatis, by Jonathan Prüss, 1499

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Internet Archive)

Whales, sea pigs, orcas, sea serpents and other monsters on Carta Marina, a map by Olaus Magnus, 1527-1539

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Wikimedia Commons)

The famous Sea Monster chart of Sebastian Münster, one of the most influential works of 16th century, created in 1539

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Wikimedia Commons)

A sea serpent and a hydra from Konrad Gesner's Historiae Animalium, 1558

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via National Library of Medicine)

A sea-pig from La descriptione dela Puglia, 1567

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Newfilmkritik)

Two giant fishes attacking a ship off the coast of America, in a map from the first true modern atlas named Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, written by Abraham Ortelius, first printed in 1570

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Columbia University)

A giant squid, whales, a sea serpent and some monsters from Adriaen Coenen's Visboek, 1580

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

A monkfish:

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

The Tigruis, a half-blind monster who loves to follow ships, because it "likes to watch the sails being hoisted":

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via National Library of the Netherlands)

St. Brendan holding a mass on the back of a whale from Nova typis transacta navigatio novi orbis Indiæ occidentalis, by Bernardo Buil in 1621

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Streets of Salem)

A marine dragon from Monstrorum Historia, by Ulissi Aldrovandi, first published around 1642

Centuries-Old Drawings of Europe's Greatest Sea Monsters

(via Paul K)