For the Weekend: How to Bake a Planetary Structural Layer Cake

You're looking at the geo-culinary creation of self-taught chef Rhiannon, showrunner of the mouthwatering baking blog Cakecrumbs. Her latest creation? This scientifically accurate structural layer cake of Jupiter.

"Our knowledge is mostly theoretical of course," she writes, "but the gas giants are thought to have a core comprised mostly of rock and ice," depicted here with mudcake. "This is surrounded by a layer liquid metallic hydrogen [using almond butter cake, naturally], and the outer layer is composed of molecular hydrogen [vanilla cake, dyed blue]." The cake, she admits, "is totally not to scale." I think we can give her a pass. Because planet cake.

Rhiannon's first foray into planetary cake making was just a couple of months ago, when her sister approached her with an idea for a structural layer cake of Earth:

[My sister is] doing an education degree, and her and her friends had to give a series of lessons on the geological sciences to a class of primary school kids. One of their lessons involved teaching the kids about the structure of the Earth. One of her friends came up with the idea of presenting a model of the Earth made out of cake. So my sister asked me if I could make a spherical cake with all the layers of the Earth inside it.

I told her I couldn't do it. "How do you get a sphere inside a sphere inside a sphere?" I recall saying. "Oh yeah," she replied, realising what it would involve.

So Rhiannon got to thinking. "I don't admit defeat," she writes. "Ever. But especially not with cake." Then she had a breakthrough, which she documents here. She wound up with this:

For the Weekend: How to Bake a Planetary Structural Layer Cake

Next came the Jupiter cake pictured at the top of this post, which she created via a slightly different process. Now, Rhiannon has created an in-depth tutorial to spherical concentric layer cakes, for all your geology-themed festivities. Included below is the video tutorial, but you'll want to check out Cakecrumbs for batter recipies and other little details:

[Cakecrumbs via I F*cking Love Science]