Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms

These macroscopic images of living creatures from the Olympus Bioscapes competition are a view of nature at its tiniest.

One of the cool things about photography using microscopes is the way it turns some of the most everyday objects on their head. Check out some of the other contest winners and honorable mentions below, and then show us some of your favorite photographs — ranging from the microscopic all the way to the view from space — and post them in the comments now. What are some of your favorite images that have changed the way you see something?

Top image: Laurie Knight, European hornet; Other images in order: Pekka Honkakoski, Black Beetle; Kurt Wirz, "Brother bugs." Gonocerus acuteangulatus, two hours old; Charles Krebs, Phantom midge larva (Chaoborus) "Glassworm."; Igor Siwanowicz, Single-cell fresh water algae (desmids); Dorit Hockman, Embryo of black mastiff bat Molossus rufus; David Millard, Great purple hairstreak butterfly (Atlides halesus); Jens Petersen, Hairy filament and closed anther of a flower of Verbascum nigrum; Poulomi Ray, chick embryonic kidney; Igor Siwanowicz, Open trap of aquatic carnivorous plant, humped bladderwort Utricularia gibba (winner of the competition); Andrew Woolley and Aaron Gilmour, Complex cell culture based on mouse embryonic brain cells.

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life formsS

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life formsS

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life formsS

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life formsS

Award-winning images of some of the world's smallest life forms