I accidentally carbonated ice cream... and you can too!

You want to add a little kick to your ice cream — or anything else? Try one strange trick, and you can make anything fizzy. All it takes is some dry ice and a strong stomach.

If you want to eat ice cream while camping in the desert, you have two options. You can grow up, or you can get some dry ice and put that dry ice in a cooler and, with a sublime lack of interest in whether the cooler explodes, lock some ice cream in there with it. I didn't become a blogger to grow up — so you can guess which option I chose. I have to say, despite occasional eruptions of carbon dioxide from the cooler, it worked pretty well. If anything, the ice cream was a little too cold and had to warm up slightly before we ate it.

It was also a little . . . off. We didn't pin down the flavor change at first. There was a weird tang, somewhat like citrus but without the exact flavor of a fruit. Or perhaps it was just more acidic. And there seemed to be little bursts of flavor and pressure on our tongues as we ate.

That's when we realized: The ice cream was carbonated. The carbon dioxide gas had pushed through the cardboard carton, and filled our ice cream with bubbles. The slight acidity of the ice cream came from the carbonic acid formed when carbon dioxide mixes with water.

You too can carbonate your ice cream. In fact, you can carbonate a lot of things. Drop almost anything, as long as it has a lot of liquid content, into a container with dry ice, and you'll make it acidic and fizzy. Fruit is a popular version, but you can try it with coffee (either put the dry ice directly in it, or put it in a paper cup on top of dry ice), or marshmallows, or jellybeans or anything else that doesn't have quite the fizz you want it to have. Remember to put some holes in the large container with the dry ice, so it doesn't explode, and make your life sparkle.

Top Image: cyclonebill