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Why Whale Songs Are Still One Of Science's Greatest Mysteries

Humpback whales are renowned for their ability to produce songs of remarkable beauty, complexity, and duration. But despite decades of research, scientists still aren't sure why these whales engage in such elaborate acoustic displays. Here's what we know — and have yet to learn — about the humpback whale's song. » 3/19/15 11:40am 3/19/15 11:40am

Monkeys Remember "Words" Used by Their Ancestors Centuries Ago

In the mid-1600s, green monkeys from Africa were introduced to the West Indies island of Barbados. Despite living a predator-free life for centuries, the Barbados population still responds to an ancestral alarm call that means, roughly translated, “Run up a tree or a leopard will eat you!” » 10/30/13 7:40am 10/30/13 7:40am

Wild dolphins will greet one another by exchanging names

We all know dolphins are intelligent animals. So intelligent, in fact, that a document called the Declaration of Rights for Cetaceans — which argues that dolphins should be afforded similar rights as humans — has actually been gaining some serious traction among scientists and ethicists in recent years. » 3/01/12 12:51pm 3/01/12 12:51pm

Proof that human-whale communication will begin with a mariachi band

Juno, a beluga whale in a Connecticut aquarium, is known for his lively interactions with visitors - sometimes he gets aggressive, but other times he bobs to a mariachi beat, as you can see here. It's hard to say what we're witnessing, but it certainly seems like Juno is imitating the motions of the musicians as… » 8/04/11 10:20am 8/04/11 10:20am

Crested Dinosaurs Had Brains Designed for Talking

For decades scientists have been mystified by the strangely-shaped skulls of the duck-billed, crested dinosaurs known as lambeosaurus. Their nasal passages are extremely long and twisty, looping up over the tops of their skulls. Originally it was believed that these were just super-noses providing a keen sense of… » 10/16/08 7:00am 10/16/08 7:00am