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We Thought These Microscopic Invertebrates Never Had Sex. Maybe We Were Wrong.

Chances are, you’ve never heard of bdelloid rotifers, strange microscopic creatures that typically live in freshwater ponds and streams. In the grand scheme of things, they’re related to arthropods, a group which includes insects, spiders, and crustaceans. But honestly, they’re in a unique class all their own. And… »9/02/15 11:11amWednesday 11:11am

Meanwhile in the Future: Endangered Animals Live in Armored Zoos

Many scientists believe that the Earth is approaching another mass extinction event. Between deforestation, pollution, hunting, and general human encroachment, all sorts of species are at risk of going extinct. In this week’s future, humans give up on saving species where they live and instead put them in armored zoos. »9/01/15 1:10pmTuesday 1:10pm

How Lurking Predators Changed the Size of the Mosquitofish's Genitals

Female mosquitofish give birth to tiny babies, like the guppies you may remember from your third-grade aquarium. That means male mosquitofish don’t spawn: if they’re going to be dads, they need to use a modified fin (called a gonopodium) to inseminate their mate. And sex with a long, stiff fin demands a daunting level… »8/25/15 8:00am8/25/15 8:00am