Meet the "Snot Otter," North America's Biggest Salamander

If you've splashed around in the creeks of Appalachia, you may have been close to the largest salamander in North America, the Eastern hellbender, but you probably wouldn't have known it. Learn about this magnificent critter in a short documentary produced by Freshwaters Illustrated and the US Forest Service. » 10/24/14 6:09pm Yesterday 6:09pm

The Art on These Endangered Species Stamps Is Incredible

Since 1993, the United Nations has worked to increase global awareness of endangered species through a special set of commemorative postal stamps released each year. This year's set was released today, and features an array of 12 beautifully drawn endangered marine animals. » 10/24/14 1:34am Yesterday 1:34am

This Truculent Duck Evolved The Bodily Equivalent Of Brass Knuckles

Everyone, meet the steamer duck. The steamer duck is one bad mother. See those orange nubbins on its wings? Those are keratinized spurs, which the steamer duck has evolved to wallop the living cuss out of any creature hapless enough to cross its path. (See that red stuff on the duck's head? Yeah. That's blood.) » 10/19/14 7:30am 10/19/14 7:30am

How A Single Parasite Species Can Change Every Life-Form Around It

Parasites are nature's freeloaders, living off their hosts while giving nothing in return. But scientists have come to appreciate that even the greediest parasites can indirectly benefit other species by manipulating ecosystems—providing food, assisting predators and even building habitats. » 10/17/14 11:00am 10/17/14 11:00am

Even Animal Planet Is Making A Zombie TV Series Now

Animal Planet has announced that it's optioned The Other Dead, the IDW comic book about a world where a zombie virus appears that only infects (non-human) animals. Sure, it sounds a little goofy at first, but consider how completely screwed you'd be if you were attacked by more than two undead squirrels at once. » 10/10/14 2:20pm 10/10/14 2:20pm

How to Understand What You're Seeing in Aerial Pictures of Whales

This is a fascinating interview with marine scientist John Durban, who explains how his team is using drones to monitor the health of killer whales in the waters off the coast of California. The best part is that he shows us how to understand what we're seeing in aerial photographs of the whales. » 10/09/14 12:29pm 10/09/14 12:29pm