World's Oldest Stone Tools Found, Predate Homo Genus By 500,000 Years


Researchers working in Kenya's archaeologically prolific Lake Turkana region claim to have uncovered a set of 3.3-million-year-old stone tools. That's 700,000 years older than the previous record, and predates evidence for the evolutionary origins of the genus Homo by half a million years.
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New Fossil Dating Technique Casts Doubt On Human Origins

A new dating technique has revised the estimated age of Little Foot from 2.2 million to 3.6 million years ago. That’s significant because it places the rare Australopithecus fossil within the same evolutionary timeframe as Lucy, a hominid from a separate species. Meaning humans may not be related to Lucy after all. » 4/02/15 7:40am 4/02/15 7:40am

Discovery Of 8,000-Year-Old Wheat Could Rewrite Ancient British History

A DNA analysis of wheat found in an ancient peat bog suggests early Britons were more commercially sophisticated than previously thought. The presence of wheat on the British Isles a full 2,000 years before farmers began cultivating cereal grains means these hunter-gatherers may have established important trade… » 2/27/15 1:20pm 2/27/15 1:20pm

This Is What The Paleo Diet Was Really Like

Reconstructions of human evolution are prone to simple, overly-tidy scenarios. Our ancestors, for example, stood on two legs to look over tall grass, or began to speak because, well, they finally had something to say. Like much of our understanding of early hominid behavior, the imagined diet of our ancestors has… » 2/19/15 2:30pm 2/19/15 2:30pm

A Team of Archeologists May Have Found the Body of Cervantes

Earlier this week, experts announced that they may have found the remains of Don Quixote writer Miguel de Cervantes in crypt in Madrid. The fragments of a coffin with initials "M.C." were found under the chapel of a cloistered convent, and now forensic work will determine if one of the bodies found was actually… » 1/29/15 1:30am 1/29/15 1:30am

Musician's Recreation of Ancient Sumerian Songs Will Haunt You

These songs are examples of how art and science can come together to create something incredible. Musician Stef Conner learned to read several ancient Babylonian and Sumerian tablets written in cuneiform script, using historians' research to figure out likely pronunciation. Just listen to the results. » 12/30/14 2:54pm 12/30/14 2:54pm