Curiosity's Latest Wide-Angle Selfie Is Its Most Remarkable Photo Yet

Now would be a good time to update your desktop wallpaper. NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has snapped a spectacular — if not inexplicable — wide-angled self-portrait at the Mojave Site on Mount Sharp where the probe is currently drilling for samples. Here's how NASA created the extraordinary shot. » 2/25/15 6:40am 2/25/15 6:40am

Curiosity Has Stumbled Upon A Unique Mineral Patch

NASA's Curiosity Rover has spent the better part of a year scooting from a low lying area called Yellowknife Bay to the base of Mount Sharp. As a recent chemical analysis performed by the robotic explorer shows, this region is distinctly different from that found within Gale Crater — which is exactly what NASA… » 11/05/14 12:40pm 11/05/14 12:40pm

Curiosity Rover Finds A Huge Metal Meteorite

Talk about heavy metal! This shiny, lumpy rock spotted by NASA's Curiosity rover is likely made mostly of iron —andcame from outer space! It's an iron meteorite, similar to ones found in years past by Curiosity's forerunners Spirit and Opportunity, but is considerably larger than any of the ones the MER rovers came… » 7/15/14 7:00pm 7/15/14 7:00pm

Curiosity Has Arrived At The Breathtaking Kimberley Waypoint

NASA's intrepid Curiosity rover has arrived at a scientifically enticing destination called "The Kimberley Waypoint," where researchers hope to carry out the next drilling operation into alien Martian terrain in search of further clues about ancient Red Planet environments that may have been favorable for life. » 4/07/14 7:30am 4/07/14 7:30am

Did NASA send the Curiosity Rover to the wrong place?

A new study suggests that Mars’s 3.5-mile high Mount Sharp formed as strong winds carried dust and sand into the crater in which it rests. If true, Gale Crater probably never contained a lake, which would totally suck, because that’s one of the main reasons why NASA sent Curiosity there in the first place. » 5/09/13 9:15am 5/09/13 9:15am