Now Police Can Reconstruct Your Face From DNA Evidence

Criminals who inadvertently leave traces of their DNA at the crime scene now have something more to worry about. By isolating 24 genetic variants, researchers have developed a computer program that can construct surprisingly accurate 3D models of facial features. » 3/21/14 4:00pm 3/21/14 4:00pm

Modern humans are still carrying Neanderthal viruses

Neanderthals and Denisovans may be long gone, but their viruses continue to live on inside our bodies. The geneticists who discovered these ancient viruses aren't sure if they're bad for us, but they could make us more susceptible to certain cancers. » 11/19/13 3:40pm 11/19/13 3:40pm

Scientists Can Now Genetically Modify Facial Features

This image is a CT scan of a mouse's face — but not just any mouse. Scientists at Berkeley have identified thousands of small DNA regions responsible for influencing the development of facial features — and they used this insight to modify the faces of embryonic mice. The question now is, are humans next? » 10/28/13 8:00am 10/28/13 8:00am

Science makes it difficult for racists to be racist

There have now been a series of incidents where state workers have taken light-haired children away from their Roma parents — a witch-hunt spurred by recent events in Greece. But unlike in the past, we now have a scientific way to fight this kind of racism. » 10/24/13 10:30am 10/24/13 10:30am

Dinosaur DNA cannot be extracted from amber

Well, it looks like we may never have our own Jurassic Park. Scientists at the University of Manchester failed to pull DNA samples from insects trapped in 10,600 year-old amber, leading them to conclude that the chances of extracting intact DNA from samples millions of years older is likely impossible. » 9/13/13 4:05pm 9/13/13 4:05pm

Science and everyday life cannot and should not be separated

Today we celebrate the birthday of Rosalind Franklin, the unsung heroine who discovered DNA's double helical structure. To that end, we present the following quote, taken from a letter to Rosalind's father, wherein she weighs in on the perennial debate over science and its ability to either elevate or diminish our… » 7/25/13 2:42pm 7/25/13 2:42pm

Carnivorous plant doesn't have time for any of that junk DNA

In the human genome, only about 2% of our DNA are genes involved in coding the proteins essential to our existence. The other 98% is noncoding DNA, often called junk DNA because there's no clear purpose for it. That name might seem a bit pejorative, but a new study of the bladderwort genome suggests it's oddly… » 5/19/13 1:00pm 5/19/13 1:00pm

Artist makes portraits from DNA found in chewing gum and cigarettes

Have you ever seen a wad of chewing gum on the sidewalk and wondered about the person who spat it out? Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg has done more than wonder. She collects errant hairs, cigarette butts, fingernails, and discarded chewing gum from public places and using the DNA she finds, creates 3D portraits of how… » 5/04/13 9:00am 5/04/13 9:00am