Ancient Antarctica Was As Warm As Today's Florida And California

During the Eocene epoch, Antarctica featured high concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and a subsequent greenhouse climate. By using a new measuring technique, scientists from Yale University have now learned that Antarctic seawaters were once as warm as as those registered in Florida and California today. » 4/22/14 9:00am 4/22/14 9:00am

Watch This Terrifying Recreation Of The Deadly Oso Mud Slide

In late March, a major landslide occurred a few miles east of Oso, Washington, killing at least 35 people and engulfing an area approximately one square mile (2.6 km2). Geologists are now studying the event and they're baffled by its ferocity and speed — a slide that rushed down at an astounding 60 mph (97 km/hr). » 4/10/14 1:50pm 4/10/14 1:50pm

This Ancient Asteroid Strike Was More Insane Than We Realized

Around 3.26 billion years ago — long before the dinosaurs — a massive asteroid measuring nearly 36 miles (58 km) across smashed into the Earth. Geologists have now reconstructed this cataclysmic event, and it was far, far bigger than we thought. Here's how things went down on that fateful day. » 4/10/14 12:00pm 4/10/14 12:00pm

What would the Earth be like if it was the shape of a donut?

According to the laws of physics, a planet the shape of a donut, or toroid, could actually exist — but it's extremely unlikely to ever form naturally. But what if an advanced alien civilization decided to build one? What properties would a toroid-Earth exhibit? And what would life be like? » 2/04/14 12:00pm 2/04/14 12:00pm

A major step to predicting when supervolcanoes will explode

Scientists have learned that massive caldera volcanoes, like the one stewing beneath Yellowstone, are ruled by geological processes far different than the ones governing conventional volcanoes. These massive reservoirs of magma can explode spontaneously — an important piece of insight that can help us predict a future… » 1/06/14 2:20pm 1/06/14 2:20pm