The One Change That Could Get True Detective Back On Track For Season 3

Season 2 of True Detective wrapped up last Sunday with a less-than-stellar finale: the various story lines mostly came together, but this season lacked much of the impact and focus of the HBO show’s first season. Allow me to suggest one change that should help the show get back on track: Take the story out of the… »8/15/15 8:00pm8/15/15 8:00pm

It's The 174th Birthday Of The Detective Story, So Read The Very First!

Or re-read, more likely. Take a coffee break and enjoy Edgar Allan Poe’s The Murders in the Rue Morgue, published in 1841 in Graham’s Lady’s and Gentlemen’s Magazine (and written before the word “detective” was in use). Read it via the Poe Museum’s website, among other short-story selections, here. »4/20/15 8:00pm4/20/15 8:00pm

How Did Edgar Allan Poe Manage To Describe The Big Bang In 1848?

They mocked when Edgar Allan Poe published his prose poem "Eureka" in his last year of life, describing how the universe had begun with a single "primordial particle" that exploded outwards in "one instantaneous flash." But 80 years later, cosmologists started realizing that Poe had been on to something. »1/28/15 10:00pm1/28/15 10:00pm

Major Landmarks In The History Of Dark Fantasy

Dark fantasy is more popular than ever. Game of Thrones is rocking our TV sets. Tons of authors have moved to the genre. We're obsessed with bloody tales of morally gray people and supernatural forces. But where does dark fantasy come from? And how did it become so huge? Here's a brief history of dark fantasy's… »4/25/14 4:05pm4/25/14 4:05pm

Boston's New Edgar Allan Poe Statue Is Going to Be Epic

This is a clay model of the final design for the life-size statue of Edgar Allan Poe that will be unveiled on October 5, 2014 at 2pm, at the corner of Boylston Street and Charles Street South in Boston, which is also named "Edgar Allan Poe Square." It's got Poe with his coat flapping in the wind, a suitcase, and… »4/13/14 3:30pm4/13/14 3:30pm

Crowdfund the reprinted adventures of Canada's first superheroine

This week, we have a few groups of people looking to bring historic works of art to a modern audience. There are the reprinted adventures of Nelvana, a superheroine from Canada's Golden Age, a publication of 19th-century illustrations for Poe's "The Raven," and a documentary about a famed Victorian taxidermist. »10/13/13 3:00pm10/13/13 3:00pm

The Webcomic Guide to the Apocalypse: Early Tales of Comets Destroying the World

In the Webcomic Guide to the Apocalypse, I've been drawing short comics about very early apocalyptic fiction. So far, I've covered stories about plagues and the dying Earth, and this week, we're looking above, to some 19th-century tales in which comets threaten to destroy human civilization—and sometimes extinguish… »1/27/13 4:00pm1/27/13 4:00pm

Illustrations that made Edgar Allan Poe's stories even more horrifying

In 1919, everyone wanted a copy of the deluxe edition of Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination, but not because it was bound in vellum with real gold lettering. It was because of these grim and gorgeous illustrations by Harry Clarke, which added an extra dose of horror to Poe's already terrifying tales. »5/05/12 4:30pm5/05/12 4:30pm

John Cusack explains why Edgar Allan Poe created everything you love

Before there was black eyeliner-ed youths rocking out to death rock, there was Edgar Allan Poe, the Godfather of Goth. But John Cusack — who plays the thirsty scribe in his wild horror flick The Raven — wants you to know that this angry (and very broke) poet is responsible for so much more. Everyone stole from Poe.… »4/24/12 6:02pm4/24/12 6:02pm