Here's What Sharks Do When You Give Them Cameras

Fisheries biologist John Shepherd once said that “counting fish is like counting trees—except you can’t see them and they move.” This can make animal behavior research extremely difficult. And while increasingly advanced electronic telemetry tags can tell us a lot, there’s just no substitute for seeing a behavior on… » 5/20/15 1:40pm 5/20/15 1:40pm

Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf Will Likely Disintegrate By Decade's End

Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf, which has existed for at least 10,000 years, will likely crumble completely away before the end of this decade, according to a new NASA study. “Although it’s fascinating scientifically,” says JPL researcher Khazendar, who led the investigation, “it’s bad news for our planet.” » 5/15/15 11:20am 5/15/15 11:20am

Learning From Australia's Drought Lessons to Avoid a Mad Max Future

The drought is no longer a California problem. The Colorado River, which supplies water to one-eighth of the country’s population, is reporting record low water levels due to overallocation. The US needs a little perspective when it comes to how bad this is going to get. Luckily we have one: Australia. » 5/15/15 12:40pm 5/15/15 12:40pm

Here's What Could Happen If Antarctica's Ice Is Melting From Below

File this under, "Welp, this is worse than we thought." A study published in Nature Geoscience finds that warm seawater is likely getting under an East Antarctica glacier and melting it from below. If the glacier's ice shelf melts, runway melting could cause another 11 feet of sea-level rise—that's on top of… » 3/17/15 8:36pm 3/17/15 8:36pm

When Did The Anthropocene Begin? Here Are The Two Most Plausible Dates.

The Anthropocene, for the uninitiated, is a proposed (albeit still informal) geological epoch, characterized by the global impact of human activity. But the question these days, at least among researchers concerned with such things, doesn't have to do with what the Anthropocene is, but when. » 3/11/15 6:00pm 3/11/15 6:00pm