Do Different Kinds Of Alcohol Get You Different Kinds Of Drunk?

When your friend gets tipsy and starts rambling about how tequila turns her into a savage party monster, and then your other friend vehemently calls bullshit, calmly put your hands up and say this: "Friends. Please. I got this." And then explain to them what I'm about to explain to you. » 8/15/14 11:00am 8/15/14 11:00am

The scientific way to make alcohol disappear

No, not that way. That'll come later. For now, you can get some (purified) ethanol and some water, and do a quick experiment that involves one of those thing disappearing into the other. All you need is some water, and some ethanol, a cup measure and a glass or two to mix them in. » 11/14/13 6:20am 11/14/13 6:20am

Do different kinds of alcohol get you different kinds of drunk?

When your friend gets tipsy and starts rambling about how tequila turns her into a savage party monster, and then your other friend vehemently calls bullshit, calmly put your hands up and say this: "Friends. Please. I got this." And then explain to them what I'm about to explain to you. » 4/26/13 3:20pm 4/26/13 3:20pm

How does alcohol get you drunk?

There's a whole lot of things that people stuff in their faces. Some of them keep those people alive. Some of them taste good to those people. Some of them help those people win pie-eating contests. Alcohol does none of those things. Why do people keep putting it in their bodies? And what does it do once it gets there? » 9/02/12 9:00am 9/02/12 9:00am

10 Things Alcohol is Excellent At (Besides Getting You Drunk)

Alcoholic beverages have come in many forms over the years, and gone by almost as many names. "Social lubricant," "liquid courage," "mother of bad-decisions"... the list goes on and on. Many of these names stem from alcohol's most noteworthy quality: it'll get you drunk. » 3/26/12 10:32am 3/26/12 10:32am

This is what your brain on drugs really looks like

Scientists this week published a study that reveals what the human brain looks like under the influence of psilocybin, the hallucinogenic chemical found in magic mushrooms. » 1/25/12 9:05am 1/25/12 9:05am

Bugs from your colon could produce the world's next great energy source

For years, the energy industry has been looking to seaweed to become the next big source of biofuel. But the algae plant has its drawbacks. Much of its energy is stored in a form of sugar that is difficult to tap into; this snag drives the cost of biofuel produced from seaweed up, and its viability as an alternative‚Ķ » 1/20/12 7:22am 1/20/12 7:22am

Genetically-engineered yeast brings us closer to a biofuel future

Biofuels like ethanol could help us reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, but growing crops for ethanol involves using up huge swaths of valuable farmland. Now we might have a solution - thanks to some re-engineered yeast. » 9/10/10 7:00am 9/10/10 7:00am