The Bloody Thumb Print That Changed The World Of Crime-Solving Forever

Fingerprints were used for identification in ancient China and Babylonia to mark business deals and correspondence. Though they were studied extensively since then, their value as a crime-solving tool wasn’t embraced until the 1880s — and it wasn’t until 1892, in Argentina, that they nailed their first murderer. »5/14/15 2:18pm5/14/15 2:18pm

FBI Admits Flawed Forensics May Have Led To Wrongful Convictions 

The FBI and the Justice Department admitted that flawed forensic testimony over more than 20 years — particularly pertaining to hair analysis — may have led to wrongful convictions in hundreds of cases, including 14 instances where a possibly innocent defendant was executed or died in prison. »4/20/15 5:26pm4/20/15 5:26pm

A Forensic Photographer Explains The Fine Art Of Capturing A Crime Scene

Forensic photographer Nick Marsh discusses his 20-year career in David Beazley's five-minute documentary. Among the revelations: lighting, composition, and keeping an open mind are of utmost importance — and technology has actually harmed his profession by flooding the field with undertrained shutterbugs. »4/16/15 9:00pm4/16/15 9:00pm

How A Note Attached To A Severed Sheep's Head Helped Solve A Murder

On April 9, 1984, Margaret Backhouse's car wouldn't start. Her husband, hairstylist-turned-sheep farmer Graham, quickly offered up his vehicle instead. But as soon as she turned the ignition, a bomb rocked the English countryside. Scandal — and impressive feats of forensic science — soon followed. »4/09/15 3:34pm4/09/15 3:34pm

How To Identify The Long-Lost Corpse Of A Famous Historical Figure

The remains of Richard III were recently reinterred after the Plantagenet king was discovered beneath a car park. And this year, researcher announced that they may have discovered the remains of Don Quixote author Miguel de Cervantes. But when a corpse has been missing so long, how do you identify the remains? »4/02/15 12:00pm4/02/15 12:00pm

Inside the Forensic Lab That Fights Crime and Counterfeits With DNA

What you're looking at is me, being blasted by a fog machine. It's not a prop for a rave or a haunted house; it's vapor laced with custom DNA particles that could prove I was at the scene of a crime. And it's just one way a cutting-edge security firm is using life's building blocks to detect counterfeits and bust… »9/27/14 5:29pm9/27/14 5:29pm