7 Lesser-Known Victorian Inventors Who Were Just As Fascinating As Tesla

When we see science fiction stories set during the Victorian and Edwardian eras, the inventor Nikola Tesla tends to show up an awful lot. But the Victorian era and the early 20th century are filled with inventors who led fascinating lives, lives that just don’t tend to turn up in fiction. » 4/30/15 10:00am Thursday 10:00am

When the FAA Blasted Oklahoma City with Sonic Booms For 6 Months

Have you ever experienced a sonic boom? A sonic boom so forceful that your dishes fell from the cupboards, your photos fell off the walls, and maybe your ceiling even started to crack? This was the reality that residents of Oklahoma City endured for six months in 1964 — eight times per day. » 4/28/15 5:46pm Tuesday 5:46pm

Why Is It Called "Rebooting"?

You hear the phrase all the time when you’re working with computers, especially on customer service calls: “Please reboot your computer.” Why do we use the word reboot to mean “turn it off and on again”? It all goes back to tech history — and to one of the most revolutionary aspects of these computing machines. » 4/24/15 12:01pm 4/24/15 12:01pm

These Japanese Candy Animals Were Once Sold By Ninjas

At a tiny shop in the old downtown of Tokyo, you can see an art form that almost died out—and eat it, too. The craftspeople at Amezaiku Yoshihara make intricate candy creatures by hand as you watch, forming sugary starch into delicate legs, wings, and ears in just the couple of minutes before the candy hardens.
» 4/21/15 9:00pm 4/21/15 9:00pm

How The Most Daring Plan Of WWI Turned Into A Military Disaster

This coming Sunday marks the centenary of one of WWI’s most infamous campaigns: Gallipoli. It was an audacious attempt by the Entente to break the European deadlock with a master stroke. Instead, it quickly turned into a hellish ordeal and a resounding defeat. Here’s why Gallipoli seemed like a good idea at the time… » 4/20/15 11:10am 4/20/15 11:10am

A 250-Year-Old Clock Claimed A World Record (And Vindicated Its Maker)

Shortly before his death in 1776, eccentric British clock-maker John Harrison claimed to have designed the ‘perfect’ clock, one that would keep time flawlessly. His rivals and peers wrote it off as the boastings of a bitter, 80-year-old failure — but in modern-day light, Harrison has finally been proved right. » 4/20/15 4:30am 4/20/15 4:30am

How Lord Byron's Scandals Led Ada Lovelace To Become A Mathematician

Ada Lovelace is now most famously known as the mother of computer science, but during her lifetime, she was also well known on account of her famous father: Lord Byron. Although Ada never met her father, his scandalous behavior had a profound effect on how she was raised — on a strict diet of mathematics. » 4/17/15 8:00am 4/17/15 8:00am

Abraham Lincoln Autopsy Notes Reveal The Horror Of An Assassin's Gunshot

The Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY just opened a new installation, "Autopsy for a Nation: The Death of Abraham Lincoln," marking the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's assassination. The exhibit's key items include handwritten notes by the physicians who conducted the President's autopsy. » 4/16/15 2:40pm 4/16/15 2:40pm

Alan Turing's Hidden Manuscript Just Sold For $1 Million

Alan Turing, Engima-breaking mathematician and Benedict Cumberbatch lookalike, never wrote much during his life — manuscripts and diaries are hard to come by. The best remaining example was a 56-page notebook working on “the foundations of computer science”, which just sold at auction for $1,025,000. » 4/14/15 1:30am 4/14/15 1:30am

Nearly 200 Years Ago, Awful Crimes Were Committed In This Lovely House

New Orleans visitors interested in macabre history are required to pass by the LaLaurie Mansion, located at 1140 Royal Street. Its genteel exterior masks its horrifying history, revealed 181 years ago today when a fateful fire broke out and the secrets within its walls were unleashed. » 4/10/15 8:00pm 4/10/15 8:00pm