How the United States Looked to the Civilized World in 1803

In 1803, the United States was still struggling to be taken seriously as a nation. Still, it seemed promising enough that the great civilization known as the Ottoman Empire began to take notice of it. This gorgeous map is one of the earliest and most detailed that Ottoman geographers produced of the region. » 10/29/14 1:30pm Wednesday 1:30pm

​What's The Night Before Halloween Called? It Depends On Where You Live

Cabbage Night? Devil's Eye? The evening of October 30th has long been a time for pranks across the U.S., but as this map prepared by the Cambridge Online Survey of World Englishes reveals, the name for these nighttime "festivities" varies considerably depending on local traditions and dialects. » 10/29/14 9:30am Wednesday 9:30am

1,000 Years of Scientific Texts From The Islamic World Are Now Online

Between the 9th and 19th centuries, Arabic-speaking scholars translated Greek, Latin and even Sanskrit texts on topics such as medicine, mathematics and astronomy, fostering a vibrant scientific culture within the Islamic world. Some of the most influential texts are now available at the Qatar Digital Library. » 10/28/14 8:30am Tuesday 8:30am

Wrecks From WWII Convoy Battle Discovered Off North Carolina Coast

Researchers from the NOAA have discovered two sunken vessels from a Second World War convoy battle about 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. The German U-boat 576 and a merchant ship, Bluefields, were found just a few hundred yards apart. The find shows just how close the war came to American shores. » 10/22/14 9:40am 10/22/14 9:40am

Unseen Photos Of The Titanic's Launch Will Give You Chills

There's a new exhibition at an Irish museum showcasing previously unpublished sepia-tinged photos of the ill-fated Titanic as it's being launched to sea. The goose-bump inducing images show the luxury liner as it's going down the Belfast shipyard's slipway, along with excited spectators cheering on. If only they… » 10/17/14 7:20am 10/17/14 7:20am

Study Reveals The Dust Bowl Was The Worst Drought In 1,000 Years

In the 1930s, the southwestern Great Plains suffered a series of severe droughts. Overfarming and overgrazing had destroyed prairie grasses, making the topsoil even more vulnerable to strong winds. NASA scientists now say that one of those drought years, 1934, was the driest and most widespread in a millennium. » 10/15/14 7:30am 10/15/14 7:30am