Celebrating Jean-Félix Picard's Birthday With Geodetic Trivia

If you find having a favourite map projection a delightfully geeky quirk, you're going to want to raise a toast in honour of Jean-Félix Picard. Geodetics and cartography owe a debt of gratitude to the 17th century scientist who made the first accurate measurement of the Earth's size. » 7/22/14 5:27am Tuesday 5:27am

Most Wearable Technology Has Been a Commercial Failure, Says Historian

Given the hype around wearable technology like Google Glass, you might be surprised to learn that the wristwatch is still the most successful example of modern wearable tech. Over the past century, wearables have mostly been commercial failures. A new book from MIT Press explores this forgotten history. » 7/21/14 4:42pm Monday 4:42pm

Scotland's Mysterious Petroglyphs Are About to Become Visible Again

Created by people living 5,000 years ago in Scotland, the Cochno Stone is a beautiful example of ancient European "cup and ring" carving. These are created by making grooves and indentations in the rock, creating vast, swirling patterns that may have guided rivulets of liquid during ceremonies. » 7/18/14 4:02pm 7/18/14 4:02pm

Darwin's Entire Library Aboard The HMS Beagle Is Now Available Online

A historian has reconstructed the lost library of books that accompanied Charles Darwin during his five-year scientific voyage across the world, allowing the public to read the more than 400 volumes that served as reference and inspiration for the young naturalist whose theories would revolutionize biology. » 7/17/14 6:55am 7/17/14 6:55am

The Most Popular Sport in North America 900 Years Ago

Beneath the freeways of East St. Louis in Illinois there lie the ruins of a city built nearly a millennium ago, around towering earthen pyramids. Today called Cahokia, it held as many as 40 thousand people, and their influence spread throughout the southeast U.S. — mostly due the popularity of a game called chunkey. » 7/14/14 11:18am 7/14/14 11:18am