Animals That Doubled Their Expected Lifespan

In the Mediterranean there is a meadow of sea grass thought to be over 100,000 years old. In the White Mountains of California, there stands a Great Basin Bristlecone Pine that researchers estimate is 5,063 years old. But plants aren't the only organisms that know how to grow old. Here are nineteen Methuselahs of… » 6/13/14 2:20pm 6/13/14 2:20pm

More Evidence That Youthful Blood Can Reverse The Effects Of Aging

A few years ago, scientists from Stanford discovered that it's possible to reverse cognitive decline in old mice by injecting them with the blood of the young. Now, researchers have isolated the mechanism responsible for this rejuvenation — and it's a protein that's found in humans as well. » 5/05/14 12:25pm 5/05/14 12:25pm

Craig Venter's new longevity startup will make "100 the new 60"

Biotechnologist Craig Venter — the first scientist to map the human genome and create synthetic life — now wants to dramatically extend the human lifespan. His new company, Human Longevity Inc., will use both genomics and stem cell therapies to help people stay healthy and vibrant for as long as possible. » 3/05/14 7:35am 3/05/14 7:35am

Why Supercentenarians Hold the Key to Extended Life

Supercentenarians are rare people who have reached the age of 110 and remain fit. Amazingly, many of them never get sick, despite having some bad health habits in some cases. Scientists say it all comes down to genetics — which could lead to a gene therapy that promotes longevity. Here's how super-c's will help us… » 1/03/14 11:27am 1/03/14 11:27am

​Scientists engineer worms to live the equivalent of 500 human years

In an experiment that even caught the researchers by surprise, nematode worms had their lifespans increased by — get this — five times. By tweaking two longevity-related genes, the researchers created an unexpected feedback effect that radically amplified lifespan. The technique could eventually be used to treat… » 12/16/13 2:20pm 12/16/13 2:20pm

This glowing blue death worm could hold the key to human longevity

In an eerie discovery, we've found that dying worms emit an intense, blue glow that begins in their intestines before radiating outward into their entire bodies. Studying this "death fluorescence" allows researchers to understand how age-related death works in humans — and possibly, pathways to slowing it. » 7/23/13 3:20pm 7/23/13 3:20pm