These Are the Most Extreme Migrations in the Animal Kingdom

Migrations occur in every major branch of the animal kingdom, from birds and crustaceans to insects and whales. But some of these journeys are amazing feats of endurance, spanning thousands of miles and deadly terrain without rest. Here's what science can tell us about the most extreme migrations, and how animals… » 10/03/13 11:00am 10/03/13 11:00am

Migaloo, perhaps the world's only white humpback whale, has been…

Everyone, say hello to Migaloo. That's what people call the white humpback whale pictured up top. When he was first spotted back in 1991, Migaloo (which is Aboriginal for "white fella") was the first all-white humpback researchers had ever seen. (And according to his website, he remains the only documented white humpback … » 9/28/12 6:40am 9/28/12 6:40am

A snowy owl makes the trip from the Arctic to Hawaii, where it is…

Every few years, beautiful two-foot-tall snowy owls migrate south in impressive numbers from the Arctic, in what bird watchers call an "irruption." But this year, the regal-looking birds (which belong to the same species as Harry Potter's Hedwig) are showing up farther south and in greater numbers than ever before. » 1/24/12 12:49pm 1/24/12 12:49pm

What lurks in the DNA of the mysterious Monarch butterfly?

For the first time ever, scientists have sequenced the genome of a creature who migrates long distances: the Monarch butterfly. The Monarch Genome Project hopes to provide insight into the butterflies' mysterious migratory pattern, which involves travel over great distances for several generations. How do these… » 11/24/11 10:08am 11/24/11 10:08am

Computer simulation reveals why it's hard to export democracy to the…

Why are so many societies based on hierarchy rather than egalitarian values, despite the fact that evidence suggests ancient human communities were often fairly egalitarian? Stanford researchers wanted to find out. So they designed a computer simulation that compared two basic types of societies: egalitarian ones, in… » 9/29/11 8:00am 9/29/11 8:00am

Snails once flew over Mexico (in the bellies of birds)

The Pacific and Atlantic horn snails were once the same species, until a land bridge blocked their path between oceans. But genetics suggest these snails still interbred long after they were cut off from each other. How? Thanks to the snail-eating birds. » 9/14/11 7:40am 9/14/11 7:40am