What West Point Cadets Learned By Studying A Classic Scifi Novel

When Chris Moseley, an instructor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, decided to teach a "special topics" course on general relativity, he opted for an unusual supplementary textbook: Larry Niven's 1973 novel Protector, which vividly depicts a battle between spaceships moving at relativistic speeds. » 11/12/14 7:30am 11/12/14 7:30am

Freakishly Compact Particle Accelerators Could Revolutionize Physics

Experiments at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the U.S. have taken us a step forward in developing a technology that could significantly reduce the size of particle accelerators and allow scientists to accelerate particles more rapidly than conventional accelerators at a much smaller size. » 11/06/14 2:20pm 11/06/14 2:20pm

How Eddie Redmayne Captured the Charisma of Stephen Hawking

Eddie Redmayne pulls off a tremendous feat in The Theory of Everything, playing Stephen Hawking from the early 1960s to the late 1980s. Not surprisingly, he's already getting a lot of Oscar buzz. We sat down with Redmayne for an exclusive interview and he told us what it was like to meet the real Hawking. » 11/06/14 1:00pm 11/06/14 1:00pm

Yes, Time Travel Is Possible; Here's How

Time travel's been one of man's wildest fantasies for centuries. It's long been a popular trend in movies and fiction, inspiring everything from Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol to H.G. Wells' The Time Machine to the Charlton Heston shrine that is The Planet of the Apes. And with the opening of Interstellar » 11/05/14 6:28pm 11/05/14 6:28pm

A Clock So Precise That It Detects Tiny Shifts In The Flow Of Time

In a basement lab at the University of Colorado Boulder, researchers have built the world's most accurate atomic clock — it can keep perfect time for 5 billion years. But the clock is so precise that it's run into a problem. Time doesn't move at the same rate everywhere in the cosmos, or even on the surface of Earth. » 11/05/14 7:40am 11/05/14 7:40am

In This Image, Two Photons Interact. Here's Why It's Groundbreaking.

Normally, photons want nothing to do with one another. Light waves just pass through each other like ghosts. But now, for the first time ever, scientists at the University of Vienna have coaxed a strong interaction between two single photons. It's an achievement that opens up radical new possibilities for a number of… » 11/04/14 12:30pm 11/04/14 12:30pm

It's Looking More and More Likely That We Live in a Multiverse

Could our massive universe be just one of many, like a bubble in a frothy stream of cosmos-spawning stuff? It sounds like something out of a 1970s British scifi novel, but it's become a popular explanation for the origin of our universe. But how can we test this hypothesis, when we're stuck in just one universe? » 11/03/14 3:20pm 11/03/14 3:20pm