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The Animal-Lover's Dilemma: I Don't Eat Meat, but My Pet Does

When moral philosopher Gary Steiner first adopted his cat Pindar, the vet advised him to put the cat to sleep. A rescue animal, Pindar had tested positive for FIV (feline AIDS) and feline leukemia, and has since developed other chronic health issues, including kidney disease. Steiner decided to keep Pindar, triggering… » 7/31/15 12:31pm Friday 12:31pm

Only Four-Year-Olds Truly Know Whether They've Gotten a Bad Deal

You probably lost the ability to recognize a bad deal before you got into kindergarten. This experiment shows that they’re able to emotionally understand when hard work has earned something that’s not worth having—but it turns out in this instance, four-year-olds are wiser than six=year-olds. » 7/28/15 6:30am 7/28/15 6:30am

How the Largest U.S. Association of Psychologists Colluded in Torture

Earlier this year, news broke that American Psychological Association had secretly collaborated with the U.S. government to make a legal and ethical case for torture in the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks. Here’s what we now know—and what we can do to prevent it from happening again. » 7/22/15 2:40pm 7/22/15 2:40pm

How a Human Scream Uniquely Activates the Fear Response in Your Brain

We know human screams are jarring. They’re loud, occasionally shrill, and tend to make us feel stressed, or even fearful. What’s unclear is why they elicit anxiety. But a new study suggests this response may have something to do with the acoustic quality of human screams, and how they trigger the brain’s fear response. » 7/17/15 1:00pm 7/17/15 1:00pm

How to Cope With an Existential Crisis

Despite the weirdness of existence, most of us are able to get on with our lives and avoid debilitating feelings of despair, personal failure, and cosmic meaninglessness. But every once in a while we’re tugged out of our complacency and forced to re-evaluate our lives. Here’s what you need to know about existential… » 7/16/15 1:00pm 7/16/15 1:00pm

What You Probably Don't Know About the Most Famous Case in Neuroscience

In 1845, a meter-long iron rod pierced the skull of Vermont railway worker Phineas Gage. The resulting changes to his personality forever changed our perception of the human brain. But what happened next to Gage is rarely covered in textbooks — a problematic oversight, say psychologists.
» 6/30/15 10:40am 6/30/15 10:40am

Let's Quit It with the Introvert/Extrovert Nonsense

Over the last few years, we’ve heard a lot about the critical differences between introverts and extroverts. We all heaved a collective sigh as we read personality descriptions, thinking, “that’s me!” But like many personality stereotypes, these aren’t very useful for understanding ourselves. » 6/25/15 12:00pm 6/25/15 12:00pm

The Power of Symbols: Why People Still Defend The Confederate Flag

South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham joined Governor Nikki Haley Monday in calling for the removal of the state capitol’s Confederate flag. They join the growing throng of voices demanding the flag be taken down in the wake of last week’s killings in Charleston. The cases that these voices have presented are… » 6/23/15 1:52pm 6/23/15 1:52pm

The Suicide Rate Among Female Veterans Is "Obscenely High"

Male suicides outnumber female in every country on Earth, usually by a lot. In the U.S., men kill themselves around four times as often as women. But results of a newly published study reveal America’s female veterans commit suicide at nearly six times the rate of other women—a rate that approaches that of male… » 6/10/15 1:20pm 6/10/15 1:20pm

The Mysterious Syndrome In Which Healthy People Can't Recall Their Past

The authors of a recent study published in Neuropsycholgia say they’ve identified a new syndrome characterized by the inability to re-live previous experiences. It sounds a lot like amnesia, but people with this rare condition are otherwise healthy and have no history of brain damage or psychological trauma.
» 6/01/15 9:30am 6/01/15 9:30am

What These Strange Shapes Can Teach Us About Facial Recognition

We glance at children say they have their father’s nose and their mother’s eyes, or their grandmother’s ears. And perhaps they do. But if we didn’t know which child was related to which parent, we’d have trouble trying pick them out by their noses or their chins alone. The question is, why?
» 5/22/15 6:30am 5/22/15 6:30am

What Psychological Problems Do You Need To Be An Action Hero?

You’re a cop on the edge, an ex-marine with nothing left to lose, or just an everyday guy who’s too old for this shit. Whatever you are, the one thing you’re not is psychologically healthy. In fact, in order to be an action hero, you basically need to be maladjusted in these very specific ways. Let’s talk about that. » 5/13/15 8:00am 5/13/15 8:00am