There's a Reliable Therapy for Sex Offenders -- But Nobody Wants Them to Get It


In June of 1994, a convicted child molester named Charlie Taylor moved into a small apartment in downtown Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, across the street from a community center. He had no family. He had no parole officer. At the time, sex offenders deemed too dangerous to be let out of prison early were, paradoxically,… »10/01/15 4:48pmThursday 4:48pm

Why Do People Take Selfies In Emergencies?

When a United Airlines flight made an emergency landing this summer due to medical situations on board, as the oxygen masks fell down, some passengers’ phone cameras went up. But psychologists say the instinct to snap a selfie in a near-death experience isn’t all narcissism—it’s also about survival and… »9/16/15 3:00pm9/16/15 3:00pm

The Animal-Lover's Dilemma: I Don't Eat Meat, but My Pet Does

When moral philosopher Gary Steiner first adopted his cat Pindar, the vet advised him to put the cat to sleep. A rescue animal, Pindar had tested positive for FIV (feline AIDS) and feline leukemia, and has since developed other chronic health issues, including kidney disease. Steiner decided to keep Pindar, triggering… »7/31/15 3:31pm7/31/15 3:31pm

How the Largest U.S. Association of Psychologists Colluded in Torture

Earlier this year, news broke that American Psychological Association had secretly collaborated with the U.S. government to make a legal and ethical case for torture in the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks. Here’s what we now know—and what we can do to prevent it from happening again. »7/22/15 5:40pm7/22/15 5:40pm